A cost-analysis of complex workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions

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dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Kirby, Ann
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Aileen
dc.contributor.author Geaney, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-17T12:17:40Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-17T12:17:40Z
dc.date.issued 2017-01-09
dc.identifier.citation Fitzgerald, S., Kirby, A., Murphy, A., Geaney, F. and Perry, I. J. (2017) 'A cost-analysis of complex workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions', BMC Public Health, 17(1), pp. 49. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3988-7 en
dc.identifier.volume 17 en
dc.identifier.startpage 49-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 49-10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3474
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12889-016-3988-7
dc.description.abstract Background: The workplace has been identified as a priority setting to positively influence individuals’ dietary behaviours. However, a dearth of evidence exists regarding the costs of implementing and delivering workplace dietary interventions. This study aimed to conduct a cost-analysis of workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions from an employer’s perspective. Methods: Cost data were obtained from a workplace dietary intervention trial, the Food Choice at Work Study. Micro-costing methods estimated costs associated with implementing and delivering the interventions for 1 year in four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork, Ireland. The workplaces were allocated to one of the following groups: control, nutrition education alone, environmental dietary modification alone and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification combined. A total of 850 employees were recruited across the four workplaces. For comparison purposes, total costs were standardised for 500 employees per workplace. Results: The combined intervention reported the highest total costs of €31,108. The nutrition education intervention reported total costs of €28,529. Total costs for the environmental dietary modification intervention were €3689. Total costs for the control workplace were zero. The average annual cost per employee was; combined intervention: €62, nutrition education: €57, environmental modification: €7 and control: €0. Nutritionist’s time was the main cost contributor across all interventions, (ranging from 53 to 75% of total costs). Conclusions: Within multi-component interventions, the relative cost of implementing and delivering nutrition education elements is high compared to environmental modification strategies. A workplace environmental modification strategy added marginal additional cost, relative to the control. Findings will inform employers and public health policy-makers regarding the economic feasibility of implementing and scaling dietary interventions. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN35108237. Date of registration: The trial was retrospectively registered on 02/07/2013. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board, Ireland and Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Ireland (HRB Centre for Health & Diet Research grant (HRC2007/13)); Health Research Board, Ireland (HRB Scholar Programme in Health Services Research under Grant No. PHD/2007/16) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Cost-analysis en
dc.subject Micro-costing en
dc.subject Workplace dietary interventions en
dc.subject Environmental dietary modification en
dc.subject Workplace health promotion en
dc.title A cost-analysis of complex workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sarah Fitzgerald, Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: sarahfitzgerald@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-01-17T12:07:39Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 378582570
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress A.Kirby@ucc.ie en


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© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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