Neuroimmune cross talk in the gut. Neuroendocrine and neuroimmune pathways contribute to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome

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dc.contributor.author O'Malley, Dervla
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-25T16:21:59Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-25T16:21:59Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-09
dc.identifier.citation O'Malley, D. (2016) 'Neuroimmune Cross Talk in the Gut. Neuroendocrine and neuroimmune pathways contribute to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome', American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 311(5), pp. G934-G941. doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00272.2016 en
dc.identifier.volume 311 en
dc.identifier.issued 5 en
dc.identifier.startpage G934 en
dc.identifier.endpage G941 en
dc.identifier.issn 0193-1857
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3522
dc.identifier.doi 10.1152/ajpgi.00272.2016
dc.description.abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and disturbed bowel habit, symptoms that impact the quality of life of sufferers. The pathophysiological changes underlying this multifactorial condition are complex and include increased sensitivity to luminal and mucosal factors, resulting in altered colonic transit and visceral pain. Moreover, dysfunctional communication in the bidirectional signaling axis between the brain and the gut, which involves efferent and afferent branches of the peripheral nervous system, circulating endocrine hormones, and local paracrine and neurocrine factors, including immune and perhaps even microbial signaling molecules, has a role to play in this disorder. This minireview will examine recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBS and assess how cross talk between hormones, immune, and microbe-derived factors and their neuromodulatory effects on peripheral nerves may underlie IBS symptomatology. en
dc.description.sponsorship Wellcome Trust (Seed Award); University College Cork (School of Medicine TRAP funding) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher American Physiological Society en
dc.rights © 2016 the American Physiological Society en
dc.subject Interleukins en
dc.subject GLP-1 en
dc.subject Leptin en
dc.subject Myenteric en
dc.subject Submucosal en
dc.title Neuroimmune cross talk in the gut. Neuroendocrine and neuroimmune pathways contribute to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Dervla O'Malley, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.omalley@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this item is restricted until 12 months after publication by the request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2017-11-09
dc.date.updated 2017-01-25T16:15:22Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 381000703
dc.contributor.funder Wellcome Trust en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.omalley@ucc.ie en


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