Divergent discourses, children and forced migration

CORA will be unavailable from 08:00- 09:00 for regular maintenance on Tuesday, 28th May 2019. Apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Doná, Giorgia
dc.contributor.author Veale, Angela
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-16T09:34:42Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-16T09:34:42Z
dc.date.issued 2011-09
dc.identifier.citation Doná, G. and Veale, A. (2011) 'Divergent discourses, children and forced migration', Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 37 (8), pp. 1273-1289. doi:10.1080/1369183X.2011.590929 en
dc.identifier.volume 37 en
dc.identifier.issued 8 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1273 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1289 en
dc.identifier.issn 1369-183X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3643
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/1369183X.2011.590929
dc.description.abstract Experiences of refugee, internally displaced and migrant children in different contexts (such as post-conflict and resettlement) are often considered separately, yet closer analysis points to the existence of commonalities across transnational locations and a need to articulate the ways in which global systems, state policies and migration processes impact on the lives of these children. Current discourses, policies and practices towards forced migrant children show that there are divergent and at times conflicting constructions of childhood and migration, and implicitly reveal the positions that these children occupy in relation to the nation-state system. In this article we focus on the existence of common divergent discourses that emerge from contexts in the global North and South, including Rwanda, Uganda, Ireland and the United Kingdom, where we have carried out research with children forced to move. Our overall aim is to re-politicise the position of child and youth forced migration through an analysis of three sets of divergent or ambivalent discourses: a) forced-migrant children as product of and threat to the nation-state; b) ‘visible’ and ‘invisible’ children; and c) the ‘psychological’ and the ‘political’ child. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis Group, LLC en
dc.rights © 2011, Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies in September 2011, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1369183X.2011.590929 en
dc.subject Migration en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Political narratives en
dc.subject Psychology en
dc.subject Africa en
dc.subject Europe en
dc.subject Refugee en
dc.subject Political en
dc.subject Discourse en
dc.subject Rwanda en
dc.subject Uganda en
dc.title Divergent discourses, children and forced migration en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Angela Veale, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.veale@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-02-16T09:21:44Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 176786781
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.veale@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement