Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Timmons, Suzanne
dc.contributor.author O'Shea, Emma
dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Desmond
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Paul F.
dc.contributor.author de Siún, Anna
dc.contributor.author McArdle, Denise
dc.contributor.author Gibbons, Patricia
dc.contributor.author Kennelly, Sean
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-23T17:57:49Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-23T17:57:49Z
dc.date.issued 2016-05-31
dc.identifier.citation Timmons, S., O’Shea, E., O’Neill, D., Gallagher, P., de Siún, A., McArdle, D., Gibbons, P. and Kennelly, S. (2016) 'Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit', BMC Geriatrics, 16, 113 (10pp). doi:10.1186/s12877-016-0293-3 en
dc.identifier.volume 16 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2318
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3684
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12877-016-0293-3
dc.description.abstract Background: Admission to an acute hospital can be distressing and disorientating for a person with dementia, and is associated with decline in cognitive and functional ability. The objective of this audit was to assess the quality of dementia care in acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Methods: Across all 35 acute public hospitals, data was collected on care from admission through discharge using a retrospective chart review (n = 660), hospital organisation interview with senior management (n = 35), and ward level organisation interview with ward managers (n = 76). Inclusion criteria included a diagnosis of dementia, and a length of stay greater than 5 days. Results: Most patients received physical assessments, including mobility (89 %), continence (84 %) and pressure sore risk (87 %); however assessment of pain (75 %), and particularly functioning (36 %) was poor. Assessment for cognition (43 %) and delirium (30 %) was inadequate. Most wards have access at least 5 days per week to Liaison Psychiatry (93 %), Geriatric Medicine (84 %), Occupational Therapy (79 %), Speech & Language (81 %), Physiotherapy (99 %), and Palliative Care (89 %) Access to Psychology (9 %), Social Work (53 %), and Continence services (34 %) is limited. Dementia awareness training is provided on induction in only 2 hospitals, and almost half of hospitals did not offer dementia training to doctors (45 %) or nurses (48 %) in the previous 12 months. Staff cover could not be provided on 62 % of wards for attending dementia training. Most wards (84 %) had no dementia champion to guide best practice in care. Discharge planning was not initiated within 24 h of admission in 72 % of cases, less than 40 % had a single plan for discharge recorded, and 33 % of carers received no needs assessment prior to discharge. Length of stay was significantly greater for new discharges to residential care (p < .001). Conclusion: Dementia care relating to assessment, access to certain specialist services, staffing levels, training and support, and discharge planning is sub-optimal, which may increase the risk of adverse patient outcomes and the cost of acute care. Areas of good practice are also highlighted. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights © 2016, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Dementia en
dc.subject Quality of care en
dc.subject Hospitals en
dc.subject Audit en
dc.subject Assessment en
dc.subject Antipsychotics en
dc.subject Discharge planning en
dc.subject Specialist services en
dc.subject Staff training en
dc.subject People en
dc.subject Delirium en
dc.subject Pain en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Symptoms en
dc.subject Nurse en
dc.subject Professionals en
dc.subject Perspectives en
dc.subject Agitation en
dc.subject Outcomes en
dc.title Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Suzanne Timmons, Clinical Gerontology & Rehabilitation, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: s.timmons@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-02-23T17:46:59Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 372342503
dc.internal.wokid 000377190400001
dc.contributor.funder Atlantic Philanthropies en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Geriatrics en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.timmons@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 113


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement