The composition of human milk and infant faecal microbiota over the first three months of life: a pilot study

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dc.contributor.author Murphy, Kiera
dc.contributor.author Curley, David
dc.contributor.author O'Callaghan, Tom F.
dc.contributor.author O'Shea, Carol Anne
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Eugene M.
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Ryan, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T09:04:32Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T09:04:32Z
dc.date.issued 2017-01-17
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, K., Curley, D., O’Callaghan, T.F., O’Shea, C.A., Dempsey, E.M., O’Toole, P.W., Ross, R.P., Ryan, C.A. and Stanton, C. (2017) ‘The composition of human milk and infant faecal microbiota over the first three months of life: a pilot study’, Scientific Reports, 7, 40597 (10pp). doi:10.1038/srep40597 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3711
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/srep40597
dc.description.abstract Human milk contains a diverse array of bioactives and is also a source of bacteria for the developing infant gut. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacterial communities in human milk and infant faeces over the first 3 months of life, in 10 mother-infant pairs. The presence of viable Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in human milk was also evaluated. MiSeq sequencing revealed a large diversity of the human milk microbiota, identifying over 207 bacterial genera in milk samples. The phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and the genera Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus were the predominant bacterial groups. A core of 12 genera represented 81% of the microbiota relative abundance in milk samples at week 1, 3 and 6, decreasing to 73% at week 12. Genera shared between infant faeces and human milk samples accounted for 70-88% of the total relative abundance in infant faecal samples, supporting the hypothesis of vertical transfer of bacteria from milk to the infant gut. In addition, identical strains of Bifidobacterium breve and Lactobacillus plantarum were isolated from the milk and faeces of one mother-infant pair. Vertical transfer of bacteria via breastfeeding may contribute to the initial establishment of the microbiota in the developing infant intestine. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine (INFANTMET Project, Grant Number 10/RDT/MFRC/705); Science Foundation Ireland (APC Microbiome Institute Grant Number SFI/12/RC/2273) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Breast-milk en
dc.subject Bacterial diversity en
dc.subject Gut en
dc.subject Feces en
dc.subject Newborns en
dc.subject Delivery en
dc.subject Disease en
dc.subject Health en
dc.subject Cells en
dc.subject Women en
dc.title The composition of human milk and infant faecal microbiota over the first three months of life: a pilot study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Catherine Stanton, Psychiatry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: catherine.stanton@teagasc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-02-27T10:39:26Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 385199632
dc.internal.rssid 395506579
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000392387500001
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.dempsey@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.dempsey@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 40597


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© 2017, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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