Dietary energy density and its association with the nutritional quality of the diet of children and teenagers

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dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Laura
dc.contributor.author Walton, Janette
dc.contributor.author Flynn, Albert
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-03T12:03:26Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-03T12:03:26Z
dc.date.issued 2013-04-15
dc.identifier.citation O'Connor, L., Walton, J. and Flynn, A. (2013) 'Dietary energy density and its association with the nutritional quality of the diet of children and teenagers', Journal of Nutritional Science, 2, e10. doi:10.1017/jns.2013.8 en
dc.identifier.volume 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage e10-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage e10-8 en
dc.identifier.issn 2048-6790
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3739
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/jns.2013.8
dc.description.abstract To examine the relationship between dietary energy density (DED) and the nutritional quality of the diet, using data from the Irish National Children's Food Survey (NCFS) and the National Teens' Food Survey (NTFS), two cross-sectional studies of food consumption were carried out between 2003 and 2006. Data from the NCFS and NTFS were used to examine the intakes of nutrients and foods among those with low- (NCFS <7·56, NTFS <7·65 kJ/g), medium- (NCFS 7·56–8·75, NTFS 7·66–8·85 kJ/g) and high-energy-dense diets (NCFS >8·75, NTFS >8·85 kJ/g). A 7-d food diary was used to collect food intake data from children (n 594) and teenagers (n 441). DED (kJ/g) was calculated including food alone and excluding beverages. Participants with lower DED consumed more food (weight) but not more energy. They also consumed less fat and added sugars and more protein, carbohydrates, starch and dietary fibre and had higher intakes of micronutrients. Participants with lower DED had food intake patterns that adhered more closely to food-based dietary guidelines. Low DED was associated with multiple individual indicators of a better nutritional quality of the diet, including higher intakes of dietary fibre and micronutrients and a generally better balance of macronutrients, as well as being associated with food intake patterns that were closer to healthy eating guidelines. Taken together, these findings support the conclusion that a low DED may be an indicator of a better nutritional quality of the diet. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Government (National Development Plan 2000–2006) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en
dc.rights © The Authors 2013. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Teenagers en
dc.subject Diet quality en
dc.subject Energy density en
dc.subject Dietary guidelines en
dc.title Dietary energy density and its association with the nutritional quality of the diet of children and teenagers en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Janette Walton, Firm Programme, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: janette.walton@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-03-03T11:57:02Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 279268324
dc.internal.pmid 25191558
dc.contributor.funder Irish Government en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Nutritional Science en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress janette.walton@ucc.ie en


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© The Authors 2013. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Authors 2013. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
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