Bifidobacteria and their role as members of the human gut microbiota

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dc.contributor.author O'Callaghan, Amy
dc.contributor.author van Sinderen, Douwe
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-08T10:29:54Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-08T10:29:54Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06
dc.identifier.citation O'Callaghan, A. and van Sinderen, D. (2016) 'Bifidobacteria and Their Role as Members of the Human Gut Microbiota', Frontiers in Microbiology, 7(925). doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00925 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 925-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 925-23 en
dc.identifier.issn 1664-302X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3753
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00925
dc.description.abstract Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are among the first microbes to colonize the human gastrointestinal tract and are believed to exert positive health benefits on their host. Due to their purported health-promoting properties, bifidobacteria have been incorporated into many functional foods as active ingredients. Bifidobacteria naturally occur in a range of ecological niches that are either directly or indirectly connected to the animal gastrointestinal tract, such as the human oral cavity, the insect gut and sewage. To be able to survive in these particular ecological niches, bifidobacteria must possess specific adaptations to be competitive. Determination of genome sequences has revealed genetic attributes that may explain bifidobacterial ecological fitness, such as metabolic abilities, evasion of the host adaptive immune system and colonization of the host through specific appendages. However, genetic modification is crucial toward fully elucidating the mechanisms by which bifidobacteria exert their adaptive abilities and beneficial properties. In this review we provide an up to date summary of the general features of bifidobacteria, whilst paying particular attention to the metabolic abilities of this species. We also describe methods that have allowed successful genetic manipulation of bifidobacteria. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Grant Number SFI/12/RC/2273); Irish Research Council (Enterprise Partnership Scheme) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.rights © 2016 O'Callaghan and van Sinderen. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Bifidobacterium en
dc.subject Carbohydrate metabolism en
dc.subject Genetic modification en
dc.subject Probiotics en
dc.subject Microbe-host interaction en
dc.title Bifidobacteria and their role as members of the human gut microbiota en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Douwe Van Sinderen, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-03-08T10:24:37Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 386345373
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers In Microbiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en


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© 2016 O'Callaghan and van Sinderen. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 O'Callaghan and van Sinderen. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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