Restricted diet in a vulnerable native turtle, Malaclemys terrapin (Schoepff), on the oceanic islands of Bermuda

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dc.contributor.author Outerbridge, Mark E.
dc.contributor.author O'Riordan, Ruth M.
dc.contributor.author Quirke, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Davenport, John
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-08T11:43:33Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-08T11:43:33Z
dc.date.issued 2017-01-26
dc.identifier.citation Outerbridge, M. E., O'Riordan, R., Quirke, T. and Davenport, J. (2017) 'Restricted diet in a vulnerable native turtle, Malaclemys terrapin (Schoepff), on the oceanic islands of Bermuda', Amphibian & Reptile Conservation, 11(1), pp. 25-35. en
dc.identifier.volume 11 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 25 en
dc.identifier.endpage 35 en
dc.identifier.issn 1083-446X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3755
dc.description.abstract Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are native to Bermuda, presently inhabiting only four small brackish-water ponds. Their foraging ecology was investigated using direct observation, fecal analysis, and necropsy. They do not have as varied a diet as reported from their North American range. Small gastropods (<3 mm shell height) were found in 66.7% of fecal samples and made up 97.3% of animal material dry mass, thus dominating their diet. Scavenged fish and other vertebrates (19% of samples overall), plus terrestrial arthropods (14.3% of samples) were other common items. Polychaete worms and bivalves each occurred in less than 3% of fecal samples. Pond sediment was found in 74% of the samples, probably incidentally ingested while foraging (by oral dredging) for the gastropods. The distribution and abundance of arthropods and molluscs within the terrapins’ brackish-water environment were assessed in three different habitats; pond benthos, mangrove swamp, and grass-dominated marsh. These indicated that Bermuda’s terrapins do not fully exploit the food resources present. On Bermuda M. terrapin is basically a specialist microphagous molluscivore and mainly forages by deposit-feeding on gastropods living in soft sediments. This dietary restriction has made them particularly vulnerable to environmental contamination. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Amphibian & Reptile Conservation en
dc.relation.uri http://amphibian-reptile-conservation.org/issues.html
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be duly enforced, are as follows: official journal title Amphibian & Reptile Conservation; official journal website <amphibianreptile-conservation.org>. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Anchialine pond en
dc.subject Diamondback Terrapin en
dc.subject Fecal analysis en
dc.subject Feeding ecology en
dc.subject Aquatic gastropod en
dc.title Restricted diet in a vulnerable native turtle, Malaclemys terrapin (Schoepff), on the oceanic islands of Bermuda en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John Davenport, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.davenport@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-03-07T12:25:57Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 386217928
dc.contributor.funder Atlantic Conservation Partnership
dc.contributor.funder Bermuda Zoological Society
dc.contributor.funder Mid Ocean Golf Club, Bermuda
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Amphibian & Reptile Conservation en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.davenport@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e134


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© 2017, the Authors. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be duly enforced, are as follows: official journal title Amphibian & Reptile Conservation; official journal website <amphibianreptile-conservation.org>. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be duly enforced, are as follows: official journal title Amphibian & Reptile Conservation; official journal website <amphibianreptile-conservation.org>.
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