Size does matter: city scale and the asymmetries of climate change adaptation in three coastal towns

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dc.contributor.author Paterson, Shona K.
dc.contributor.author Pelling, Mark
dc.contributor.author Nunes, Lucí Hidalgo
dc.contributor.author de Araújo Moreira, Fabiano
dc.contributor.author Guida, Kristen
dc.contributor.author Marengo, Jose Antonio
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-15T09:44:41Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-15T09:44:41Z
dc.date.issued 2016-03-06
dc.identifier.citation Paterson, S. K., Pelling, M., Nunes, L. H., de Araújo Moreira, F., Guida, K. and Marengo, J. A. (2017) 'Size does matter: City scale and the asymmetries of climate change adaptation in three coastal towns', Geoforum, 81, pp. 109-119. doi:10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.02.014 en
dc.identifier.volume 81 en
dc.identifier.startpage 109 en
dc.identifier.endpage 119 en
dc.identifier.issn 0016-7185
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3779
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.02.014
dc.description.abstract Globally, it is smaller urban settlements that are growing most rapidly, are most constrained in terms of adaptive capacity but increasingly looked to for delivering local urban resilience. Data from three smaller coastal cities and their wider regional governance systems in Florida, US; West Sussex, UK and São Paulo, Brazil are used to compare the influence of scale and sector on city adaptive capacity. These tensions are described through the lens of the Adaptive Capacity Index (ACI) approach. The ACI is built from structuration theory and presents an alternative to social-ecological systems framing of analysis on adaptation. Structuration articulates the interaction of agency and structure and the intervening role played by institutions on information flow, in shaping adaptive capacity and outcomes. The ACI approach reveals inequalities in adaptive capacity to be greater across scale than across government, private and civil society sector capacity in each study area. This has implications for adaptation research both by reinforcing the importance of scale and demonstrating the utility of structuration theory as a framework for understanding the social dynamics underpinning adaptive capacity; and policy relevance, in particular considering the redistribution of decision-making power across scale and/or compensatory mechanisms, especially for lower scale actors, who increasingly carry the costs for enacting resilience planning in cities. en
dc.description.sponsorship Metropole Project (METROPOLE: An Integrated Framework to Analyze Local Decision Making and Adaptive Capacity to Large-Scale Environmental Change) led by Frank Muller-Karger, supported by the Belmont Forum with national funding from NERC (NE/L008963/1), NSF (ICER 1342969) and FAPESP (G8MUREFU3FP-2201-040, Fapesp Proc. 12/51876-0 and 14/14598-8). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open Access funded by Natural Environment Research Council. Under a Creative Commons license en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Adaptive capacity en
dc.subject Structuration Scale en
dc.subject Urban en
dc.subject Brazil en
dc.subject USA en
dc.subject UK en
dc.subject Adaptive capacity index en
dc.title Size does matter: city scale and the asymmetries of climate change adaptation in three coastal towns en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Shona Paterson, MaREI Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy, Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, +353 21 490 3000; E: shona.paterson@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder National Science Foundation en
dc.contributor.funder Natural Environment Research Council en
dc.contributor.funder Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Geoforum en


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© 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open Access funded by Natural Environment Research Council. Under a Creative Commons license Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open Access funded by Natural Environment Research Council. Under a Creative Commons license
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