Sounding the Bromance: The Chopstick Brothers' 'Little Apple' music video, genre, gender and the search for meaning in Chinese popular music

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dc.contributor.author Stock, Jonathan P. J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-03T12:10:56Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-03T12:10:56Z
dc.date.issued 2016-01
dc.identifier.citation Stock, Jonathan P. J. (2016) 'Sounding the Bromance: The Chopstick Brothers' 'Little Apple' music video, genre, gender and the search for meaning in Chinese popular music'. Journal Of World Popular Music, 3 (2):167-196. doi: 10.1558/jwpm.v3i2.32607 en
dc.identifier.volume 3 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 167 en
dc.identifier.endpage 196 en
dc.identifier.issn 2052-4900
dc.identifier.issn 2052-4919
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3852
dc.identifier.doi 10.1558/jwpm.v3i2.32607
dc.description.abstract This article analyses the music video of ‘Little Apple’ by Wang Taili and Xiao Yang, also known as the Chopstick Brothers, one of China’s most successful productions in 2014, and one that exemplifies certain emerging trends in Chinese popular music more generally. The music video draws on K-pop models but also on Western inspirations (biblical, historical and contemporary) and has proven hard to reduce to a single, definitive narrative or interpretation. The analysis proceeds by introducing the song and its video, in the context of the Chopstick Brothers’ wider work. Its musical structure is presented, leading to questions as to its particular retro aesthetic. This leads to a study of the emergent genre of shenqu (divine song), which is based on notions of virality, epic craziness and the earworm effect, and to which ‘Little Apple’ contributes. The final sections of the article look at the production of gendered positions within the music video— noting that it is a love song sung by one man to another—and examine the public square dance setting where this song has been so widely picked up. Finally, I suggest why it may be that ‘Little Apple’ particularly can open out a space temporarily in which participants can experience a warm sense of human collaboration. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Equinox en
dc.relation.uri https://journals.equinoxpub.com/index.php/JWPM/article/view/32607
dc.rights © Equinox Publishing Ltd 2017, Office 415, The Workstation, 15 Paternoster Row, Sheffield S1 2BX. en
dc.subject Chinese popular music en
dc.subject Gender en
dc.subject Genre en
dc.subject Music video en
dc.title Sounding the Bromance: The Chopstick Brothers' 'Little Apple' music video, genre, gender and the search for meaning in Chinese popular music en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jonathan Stock, Music, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.stock@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by the request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2018-01-31
dc.date.updated 2017-04-03T12:03:36Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 389781347
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal Of World Popular Music en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.stock@ucc.ie en


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