Cardiovascular risk factors—using repeated cross-sectional surveys to assess time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in neighbouring countries

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dc.contributor.author Hughes, John
dc.contributor.author Kabir, Zubair
dc.contributor.author Kee, Frank
dc.contributor.author Bennett, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-11T15:45:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-11T15:45:22Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-03
dc.identifier.citation Hughes, J., Kabir, Z., Kee, F. and Bennett, K. (2017) 'Cardiovascular risk factors—using repeated cross-sectional surveys to assess time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in neighbouring countries', BMJ Open, 7(4), e013442. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013442 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.issued 4 en
dc.identifier.startpage e013442-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage e013442-11 en
dc.identifier.issn 2044-6055
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3949
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013442
dc.description.abstract Objectives: This study compares trends in socioeconomic inequalities related to key cardiovascular risk factors in neighbouring countries Northern Ireland (NI) and the Republic of Ireland (RoI). Design: Repeated cross-sectional studies. Setting: Population based. Participants: 3500–4000 in national surveys in NI and 5000–9000 in RoI, aged 20–69 years. Measures: Educational attainment was used as a socioeconomic indicator by which the magnitude and direction of trends in inequalities for smoking, diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity in NI and RoI were examined between 1997/1998 and 2007/2011. Gender-specific relative and absolute inequalities were calculated using the Relative Index of Inequality (RII) and Slope Index of Inequality (SII) for both countries. Results: In both countries, the prevalence of diabetes and obesity increased whereas levels of smoking and physical inactivity decreased over time. In NI relative inequalities increased for obesity (RII 1.1 in males and 2.1 in females in 2010/2011) and smoking (RII 4.5 in males and 4.2 in females in 2010/2011) for both genders and absolute inequalities increased for all risk factors in men and increased for diabetes and obesity in women. In RoI greater inequality was observed in women, particularly for smoking (RII 2.8 in 2007) and obesity (RII 8.2 in 2002) and in men for diabetes (RII 3.2 in 2002). Conclusions: Interventions to reduce inequalities in risk factors, particularly smoking, obesity and diabetes are encouraged across both countries. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en
dc.rights © 2017, The Authors; Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.subject Cardiovascular risk factors en
dc.subject Diabetes en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Public health en
dc.subject Inequalities en
dc.title Cardiovascular risk factors—using repeated cross-sectional surveys to assess time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in neighbouring countries en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Zubair Kabir, Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: z.kabir@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-05-11T15:35:28Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 394616084
dc.contributor.funder Centre of Excellence for Public Health, Northern Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMJ Open en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress z.kabir@ucc.ie en


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© 2017, The Authors; Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, The Authors; Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
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