Perinatal outcomes of reduced fetal movements: A cohort study

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dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Claire M.
dc.contributor.author Meaney, Sarah
dc.contributor.author O'Donoghue, Keelin
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-21T11:01:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-21T11:01:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-19
dc.identifier.citation McCarthy, C. M., Meaney, S. and O’Donoghue, K. (2016) 'Perinatal outcomes of reduced fetal movements: a cohort study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16, 169 (6pp). doi: 10.1186/s12884-016-0964-2 en
dc.identifier.volume 16
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 6
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2393
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4123
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12884-016-0964-2
dc.description.abstract Background: The perception of reduced fetal movement (RFM) is an important marker of fetal wellbeing and is associated with poor perinatal outcome (such as intra-uterine death). Methods: We conducted a prospective study of women presenting with RFM over 28 weeks’ gestation to a tertiary-level maternity hospital. We examined pregnancy outcomes and compared them to a retrospectively collected control group delivering contemporaneously. Results: In total, 275 presentations were analysed in the RFM group, with 264 in the control group. Women with RFM were more likely to be nulliparous (p?=?0.002) and have an induction of labour (p?=?0.0011). 26.5 % (n?=?73) of cases were admitted following presentation with RFM, and 79.4 % (n?=?58) delivered on primary presentation. Overall, 15.2 % (n?=?42) women were induced for RFM specifically. Conclusion: This prospective study shows the increased burden of care required by those with RFM, including increased neonatal unit admission rates, increased induction rates and higher surveillance demands, demonstrating the need for increased attention to this area of practice. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-016-0964-2
dc.rights © 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Fetal movement en
dc.subject Perinatal outcome en
dc.subject Stillbirth en
dc.subject Kick counting en
dc.title Perinatal outcomes of reduced fetal movements: A cohort study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Claire McCarthy, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: claire_mccarthy@hotmail.com en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress claire_mccarthy@hotmail.com en
dc.identifier.articleid 169


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© 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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