Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: An interview study

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kelly, Maria
dc.contributor.author Sahm, Laura J.
dc.contributor.author Shiely, Frances
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Ronan
dc.contributor.author McGillicuddy, Aoife
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Suzanne
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-21T11:01:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-21T11:01:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-11
dc.identifier.citation Kelly, M., Sahm, L. J., Shiely, F., O’Sullivan, R., McGillicuddy, A. and McCarthy, S. (2016) 'Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: an interview study', BMC Public Health, 16, 540 (7pp). doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3224-5 en
dc.identifier.volume 16
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 7
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4125
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12889-016-3224-5
dc.description.abstract Background: Fever is one of the most common childhood symptoms. It causes significant worry and concern for parents. Every year there are numerous cases of over- and under-dosing with antipyretics. Caregivers seek reassurance from a variety of sources including healthcare practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding management of childhood fever in children aged 5 years and under. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 parents at six ante-natal clinics in the south west of Ireland during March and April 2015. The Francis method was used to detect data saturation and thereby identify sample size. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results: Twenty-three parents participated in the study. Five themes emerged from the data: assessing and managing the fever; parental knowledge and beliefs regarding fever; knowledge source; pharmaceutical products; initiatives. Parents illustrated a good knowledge of fever as a symptom. However, management practices varied between participants. Parents revealed a reluctance to use medication in the form of suppositories. There was a desire for more accessible, consistent information to be made available for use by parents when their child had a fever or febrile illness. Conclusion: Parents indicated that further initiatives are required to provide trustworthy information on the management of fever and febrile illness in children. Healthcare professionals should play a significant role in educating parents in how to manage fever and febrile illnesses in their children. The accessible nature and location of pharmacies could provide useful support for both parents and General Practitioners. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-3224-5
dc.rights © 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Attitudes en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Fever en
dc.subject Knowledge en
dc.subject Parents en
dc.title Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: An interview study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Maria Kelly, Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, School of Pharmacy, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: 113223823@umail.ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress 113223823@umail.ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 540


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement