Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics

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dc.contributor.author Gibson, Glenn R.
dc.contributor.author Hutkins, Robert
dc.contributor.author Sanders, Mary Ellen
dc.contributor.author Prescott, Susan L.
dc.contributor.author Reimer, Raylene A.
dc.contributor.author Salminen, Seppo J.
dc.contributor.author Scott, Karen
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Swanson, Kelly S.
dc.contributor.author Cani, Patrice D.
dc.contributor.author Verbeke, Kristin
dc.contributor.author Reid, Gregor
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-21T14:10:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-21T14:10:25Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Gibson, G. R., Hutkins, R., Sanders, M. E., Prescott, S. L., Reimer, R. A., Salminen, S. J., Scott, K., Stanton, C., Swanson, K. S., Cani, P. D., Verbeke, K. and Reid, G. (2017) 'Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics', Nature Reviews Gastroenteroly & Hepatology, advance online publication. doi: 10.1038/nrgastro.2017.75 en
dc.identifier.volume advance online publication en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 12 en
dc.identifier.issn 1759-5053
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4142
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/nrgastro.2017.75
dc.description.abstract In December 2016, a panel of experts in microbiology, nutrition and clinical research was convened by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics to review the definition and scope of prebiotics. Consistent with the original embodiment of prebiotics, but aware of the latest scientific and clinical developments, the panel updated the definition of a prebiotic: a substrate that is selectively utilized by host microorganisms conferring a health benefit. This definition expands the concept of prebiotics to possibly include non-carbohydrate substances, applications to body sites other than the gastrointestinal tract, and diverse categories other than food. The requirement for selective microbiota-mediated mechanisms was retained. Beneficial health effects must be documented for a substance to be considered a prebiotic. The consensus definition applies also to prebiotics for use by animals, in which microbiota-focused strategies to maintain health and prevent disease is as relevant as for humans. Ultimately, the goal of this Consensus Statement is to engender appropriate use of the term 'prebiotic' by relevant stakeholders so that consistency and clarity can be achieved in research reports, product marketing and regulatory oversight of the category. To this end, we have reviewed several aspects of prebiotic science including its development, health benefits and legislation. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.rights © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.subject Food microbiology en
dc.subject Microbiology en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.subject Nutrition en
dc.title Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Catherine Stanton, Psychiatry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: catherine.stanton@teagasc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-06-21T14:02:06Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 399959650
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress catherine.stanton@teagasc.ie en


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© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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