Reforming local government: Must it always be democracy versus efficiency?

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dc.contributor.author Quinlivan, Aodh
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-26T15:44:27Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-26T15:44:27Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05-23
dc.identifier.citation Quinlivan, A. (2017) 'Reforming local government: Must it always be democracy versus efficiency?', Administration, 65 (2):109-126. doi: 10.1515/admin-2017-0017 en
dc.identifier.volume 65 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 109 en
dc.identifier.endpage 126 en
dc.identifier.issn 2449-9471
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4192
dc.identifier.doi 10.1515/admin-2017-0017
dc.description.abstract The financial crisis from 2008 has had a profound impact on Irish local government. Councils were faced with a disastrous combination of factors - declining funding from central government, difficulties in collecting commercial rates as businesses struggled, and a drastic fall in revenue from development levies. Staffing levels in the local government sector were reduced by over 20 per cent, significantly more than the losses suffered by central government ministries and departments. Yet the financial crisis also offered an opportunity for reform and a fundamental reappraisal of subnational government in Ireland. A reform strategy produced in 2012 paved the way for the Local Government Reform Act, 2014. As a result of this legislation, the number of local authorities was reduced from 114 to 31 with the complete abolition of all town councils. The number of council seats also fell from 1,627 to 949. Using Scharpf’s dimensions of democratic legitimacy, this article assesses whether the focus of the 2014 reforms was on output legitimacy (efficiency and effectiveness) as opposed to input legitimacy (citizen integration and participation). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher De Gruyter Open en
dc.rights © 2017. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Local government en
dc.subject Democracy en
dc.subject Efficiency en
dc.subject Reform en
dc.title Reforming local government: Must it always be democracy versus efficiency? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aodh Quinlivan, Government, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.quinlivan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-06-26T15:41:02Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 400596078
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Administration en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.quinlivan@ucc.ie en


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© 2017. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
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