Patients’ bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer

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dc.contributor.author Landers, Margaret
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Geraldine
dc.contributor.author Livingstone, Vicki
dc.contributor.author Savage, Eileen
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-01T10:38:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-01T10:38:28Z
dc.date.issued 2014-07-12
dc.identifier.citation Landers, M., McCarthy, G., Livingstone, V. and Savage E. (2014) 'Patients’ bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23, pp. 2343–2354. doi:10.1111/jocn.12516 en
dc.identifier.volume 23 en
dc.identifier.startpage 2343 en
dc.identifier.endpage 2354 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4413
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/jocn.12516
dc.description.abstract Aims and objectives: To investigate patients’ bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer and the relationship between bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used. Background: Earlier diagnosis of rectal cancer allows for less invasive surgical treatments such as sphincter-saving procedures to be performed. Although a permanent stoma is generally not required, patients experience changes in bowel function following this surgery. However, limited research exists on patients’ bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used to manage symptoms following sphincter-saving surgery of rectal cancer. Design: Quantitative descriptive correlational. Methods: A convenience sample of 143 patients aged 30 to over 70 years was used. Data were collected (April 2010–December 2010) using the Illness Perception Questionnaires, the Difficulties of Life Scale and a researcher developed Self-care Strategy Measure. The research was underpinned by the Symptom Management Theory. Findings: Relating to the four most effective self-care strategies used respondents reporting more bowel symptom were more likely to use the self-care strategy proximity/knowing the location of a toilet at all times. Females, respondents with high timeline cyclical scores and respondents with high physiological responses scores were more likely to use protective clothing. Respondents reporting more bowel symptom and with high social responses scores were more likely to use bowel medication. Females were more likely to wear incontinence pads. Conclusion: This research provides insights into the daily bowel symptom experiences of patients following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. It demonstrates the range of self-care strategies that individuals use to manage their bowel symptoms and the self-care-strategies that were most effective for them. Relevance to clinical practice: Patients should be encouraged to report on-going bowel problems following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Supportive care for patients should be comprehensive and tailored to meet individual needs. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (PhD Grant No. 232363) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article Landers, M, McCarthy, G., Livingstone, V. and Savage E. (2014) 'Patients’ bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23, pp. 2343–2354, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.12516. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. en
dc.subject Bowel symptoms en
dc.subject Colo-rectal cancer en
dc.subject Self-care strategies en
dc.subject Sphinctersaving surgery en
dc.subject Symptom Management Theory en
dc.title Patients’ bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Margaret Landers, Nursing & Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.landers@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Eileen Savage, Nursing & Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: e.savage@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-07-27T15:42:56Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 241508404
dc.internal.rssid 271355178
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Clinical Nursing en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress e.savage@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.landers@ucc.ie en


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