Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress

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dc.contributor.author Boersma, Gretha J.
dc.contributor.author Smeltzer, Michael D.
dc.contributor.author Scott, Karen A.
dc.contributor.author Scheurink, Anton J.
dc.contributor.author Tamashiro, Kellie L.
dc.contributor.author Sakai, Randall R.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-04T08:58:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-04T08:58:38Z
dc.date.issued 2017-01-06
dc.identifier.citation Oersma, G. J., Smeltzer, M. D., Scott, K. A., Scheurink, A. J., Tamashiro, K. L. and Sakai, R. R. (2017) ‘Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress’, Physiology and Behavior, 178, pp. 126-133. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.12.041 en
dc.identifier.volume 178 en
dc.identifier.startpage 126 en
dc.identifier.endpage 133 en
dc.identifier.issn 0031-9384
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4420
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.12.041
dc.description.abstract Chronic stress exposure may have negative consequences for health. One of the most common sources of chronic stress is stress associated with social interaction. In rodents, the effects of social stress can be studied in a naturalistic way using the visual burrow system (VBS). The way an individual copes with stress, their “stress coping style”, may influence the consequences of social stress. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that stress coping style may modulate social status and influence the consequences of having a lower social status. We formed 7 VBS colonies, with 1 proactive coping male, 1 passive coping male, and 4 female rats per colony to assess whether a rat's coping style prior to colony formation could predict whether that individual is more likely to become socially dominant. The rats remained in their respective colonies for 14 days and the physiological and behavioral consequences of social stress were assessed. Our study shows that stress coping style does not predict social status. However, stress coping style may influence the consequences of having a lower social status. Subordinate passive and proactive rats had distinctly different wound patterns; proactive rats had more wounds on the front of their bodies. Behavioral analysis confirmed that proactive subordinate rats engaged in more offensive interactions. Furthermore, subordinate rats with a proactive stress coping style had larger adrenals, and increased stress responsivity to a novel acute stressor (restraint stress) compared to passive subordinate rats or dominant rats, suggesting that the allostatic load may have been larger in this group. en
dc.description.sponsorship National Institutes of Health (HD055030 and DK066596); Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (Rubicon fellowship grant 825.10.032) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.subject Visual burrow system en
dc.subject VBS en
dc.subject Social Status en
dc.title Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Karen A. Scott, Anatomy and Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: +353-21-490-3000 E: k.scott@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2018-01-06
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder National Institutes of Health en
dc.contributor.funder Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Physiology and Behavior en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.scott@ucc.ie en


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© 2017, Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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