Drunk bugs: chronic vapour alcohol exposure induces marked changes in the gut microbiome in mice

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dc.contributor.author Peterson, Veronica L.
dc.contributor.author Jury, Nicholas J.
dc.contributor.author Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl
dc.contributor.author Draper, Lorraine A.
dc.contributor.author Crispie, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Holmes, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-17T11:37:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-17T11:37:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-02-01
dc.identifier.citation Peterson, V. L., Jury, N. J., Cabrera-Rubio, R., Draper, L. A., Crispie, F., Cotter, P. D., Dinan, T. G., Holmes, A. and Cryan, J. F. (2017) 'Drunk bugs: chronic vapour alcohol exposure induces marked changes in the gut microbiome in mice', Behavioural Brain Research, 323. pp. 172-176. doi:10.1016/j.bbr.2017.01.049 en
dc.identifier.volume 323 en
dc.identifier.startpage 172 en
dc.identifier.endpage 176 en
dc.identifier.issn 0166-4328
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4465
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.01.049
dc.description.abstract The gut microbiota includes a community of bacteria that play an integral part in host health and biological processes. Pronounced and repeated findings have linked gut microbiome to stress, anxiety, and depression. Currently, however, there remains only a limited set of studies focusing on microbiota change in substance abuse, including alcohol use disorder. To date, no studies have investigated the impact of vapour alcohol administration on the gut microbiome. For research on gut microbiota and addiction to proceed, an understanding of how route of drug administration affects gut microbiota must first be established. Animal models of alcohol abuse have proven valuable for elucidating the biological processes involved in addiction and alcohol-related diseases. This is the first study to investigate the effect of vapour route of ethanol administration on gut microbiota in mice. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 4 weeks of chronic intermittent vapourized ethanol (CIE, N = 10) or air (Control, N = 9). Faecal samples were collected at the end of exposure followed by 16S sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Robust separation between CIE and Control was seen in the microbiome, as assessed by alpha (p < 0.05) and beta (p < 0.001) diversity, with a notable decrease in alpha diversity in CIE. These results demonstrate that CIE exposure markedly alters the gut microbiota in mice. Significant increases in genus Alistipes (p < 0.001) and significant reductions in genra Clostridium IV and XIVb (p < 0.001), Dorea (p < 0.01), and Coprococcus (p < 0.01) were seen between CIE mice and Control. These findings support the viability of the CIE method for studies investigating the microbiota-gut-brain axis and align with previous research showing similar microbiota alterations in inflammatory states during alcoholic hepatitis and psychological stress. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Grant No. 12/RC/2273); National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (Intramural Research Program) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd en
dc.rights © 2017, Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 en
dc.subject Chronic alcohol en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Vapour ethanol en
dc.subject Microbiota-gut-brain axis en
dc.title Drunk bugs: chronic vapour alcohol exposure induces marked changes in the gut microbiome in mice en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John F Cryan, Department Of Anatomy & Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 18 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2018-08-01
dc.date.updated 2017-08-17T11:20:10Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 407339314
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Behavioural Brain Research en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.cryan@ucc.ie en


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© 2017, Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
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