Claude McKay and the transnational novel

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Jenkins, Lee M. (Lee Margaret)
dc.contributor.author Walsh, Bairbre Anne Patricia
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-17T18:05:04Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-17T18:05:04Z
dc.date.issued 2011-09
dc.date.submitted 2011
dc.identifier.citation Walsh, B.A.P., 2011. Claude McKay and the transnational novel. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 311
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/456
dc.description.abstract This thesis considers the three works of fiction of the Jamaican author Claude McKay (1889-1948) as a coherent transnational trilogy which dramatises the semi-autobiographical complexities of diasporic exile and return in the period of the 1920s and 1930s. Chapter One explores McKay’s urban North American novel, Home to Harlem (1928). I suggest that we need to ‘reworld’ conceptions of McKay’s writing in order to release him from his canonical confinement in the Harlem Renaissance. Querying the problematics of the city space, of sexuality and of race as they emerge in the novel, this chapter considers McKay’s percipient understanding of the need to reconfigure diasporic identity beyond the limits set by American nationalism. Chapter Two engages with McKay’s novel of portside Marseilles, Banjo (1929), and considers the homosocial interactions of the vagabond collective. A comparison of North America and France as supposed exemplars of individual liberty highlights the unsuitability of nationalistic prerogatives to an internally diverse black diaspora. Paul Gilroy’s Black Atlantic construct provides a suggestive space in which to re-imagine the possibilities of affiliation in the port. The latter section of the chapter examines McKay’s particular influence on, and relationship, to the Négritude movement and Pan-African philosophies. Chapter Three focuses on McKay’s third novel, Banana Bottom (1933). I suggest here that the three novels comprise a coherent New World Trilogy comparable to Edward (Kamau) Brathwaite’s trilogy, The Arrivants. This chapter considers both the Caribbean and the transnational dimensions to McKay’s work. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://library.ucc.ie/record=b2027883~S0
dc.rights © 2011, Bairbre Walsh en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Claude McKay en
dc.subject Transnationalism en
dc.subject Black Atlantic en
dc.subject Fiction en
dc.subject Trilogy en
dc.subject.lcsh McKay, Claude, 1890-1948--Criticism and interpretation en
dc.title Claude McKay and the transnational novel en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Arts) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school English en


Files in this item

The following license files are associated with this item:

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2011, Bairbre Walsh Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2011, Bairbre Walsh
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement