The potential of power to gas to provide green gas utilising existing CO2 sources from industries, distilleries and wastewater treatment facilities

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dc.contributor.author O'Shea, Richard
dc.contributor.author Wall, David M.
dc.contributor.author McDonagh, Shane
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Jerry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-06T11:55:59Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-06T11:55:59Z
dc.date.issued 2017-07-25
dc.identifier.citation O'Shea, R., Wall, D. M., McDonagh, S. and Murphy, J. D. (2017) 'The potential of power to gas to provide green gas utilising existing CO2 sources from industries, distilleries and wastewater treatment facilities', Renewable Energy, 114, pp. 1090-1100. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2017.07.097 en
dc.identifier.volume 114 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1090 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1100 en
dc.identifier.issn 0960-1481
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4638
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.renene.2017.07.097
dc.description.abstract The suitability of existing sources of CO2 in a region (Ireland) for use in power to gas systems was determined using multi criteria decision analysis. The main sources of CO2 were from the combustion of fossil fuels, cement production, alcohol production, and wastewater treatment plants. The criteria used to assess the suitability of CO2 sources were: annual quantity of CO2 emitted; concentration of CO2 in the gas; CO2 source; distance to the electricity network; and distance to the gas network. The most suitable sources of CO2 were found to be distilleries, and wastewater treatment plants with anaerobic digesters. The most suitable source of CO2, a large distillery, could be used to convert 461 GWh/a of electricity into 258 GWh/a of methane. The total electricity requirement of this system is larger than the 348 GWh of renewable electricity dispatched down in Ireland in 2015. This could allow for the conversion of electricity that would be curtailed into a valuable energy vector. The resulting methane could fuel 729 compressed natural gas fuelled buses per annum. Synergies in integrating power to gas at a wastewater treatment plant include use of oxygen in the wastewater treatment process. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy (MaREI) Grant No.12/RC/2302) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd en
dc.rights © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Power to gas en
dc.subject Multi criteria decision analysis en
dc.subject Renewable energy en
dc.subject Energy storage en
dc.subject Bioresource en
dc.subject Renewable gas en
dc.title The potential of power to gas to provide green gas utilising existing CO2 sources from industries, distilleries and wastewater treatment facilities en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-07-25
dc.date.updated 2017-09-06T11:42:20Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 410011083
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Gas Networks Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Ervia, Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Renewable Energy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress shane.mcdonagh@ucc.ie en


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© 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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