Harnessing the bacteriocin-producing capacity of the gut with a view to controlling microorganisms that have been associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders

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dc.contributor.advisor Cotter, Paul en
dc.contributor.advisor Guinane, Caitriona en
dc.contributor.advisor Hill, Colin en
dc.contributor.advisor Ross, R. Paul en
dc.contributor.author Hegarty, James William
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-04T09:00:44Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.date.submitted 2017
dc.identifier.citation Hegarty, J. W. 2017. Harnessing the bacteriocin-producing capacity of the gut with a view to controlling microorganisms that have been associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 188 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4824
dc.description.abstract Obesity is a complex syndrome associated with a number of serious implications for human health. The gut microbiota in obesity and related metabolic conditions has received considerable attention. The aim of this project was to (1) harness the bacteriocin-producing capacity of the gut and (2) develop a bacteriocin-producing probiotic that can contribute to the prevention/treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Firstly, bacteriocin production among a selection of commercial probiotic products was examined. This investigation suggests that the commercial bacteriocin-producing probiotics are not very heterogeneous and that bacteriocin production is not being optimally harnessed as a probiotic trait. To identify strains with activity against obesity-associated targets, a culture-based screen was undertaken. Four lead bacteriocin-producing isolates were identified which successfully inhibited species enriched in type 2 diabetic patients. DPC6988 was selected for further investigation. We next investigated the impact of the bacteriocin-producing DPC6988, and another nonproducing control strain, on gut microbial populations using an ex vivo model of the distal colon. Although both strains altered microbial populations over the 24 hr fermentation period, a number of beneficial changes were attributed to DPC6988 only. Finally, the ability of DPC6988 to alter the gut microbiota and mitigate the metabolic abnormalities with respect to obesity in a DIO mouse model was examined. Despite alterations to the gut microbiota, treatment with this strain did not result in improvements to weight gain or metabolic health. Overall this thesis resulted in the identification of a number of baceriocin-producing gut microbes. Further work with DPC6988 will be necessary to understand the extent to which this strain can contribute to the prevention/treatment of obesity and related disorders and, more generally, to optimally harness the ability of bacteriocin-producing strains to beneficially change the composition of the gut microbiota. en
dc.description.sponsorship Teagasc (Teagasc Walsh Fellowship) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2017, James William Hegarty. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Probiotic en
dc.subject Bacteriocin en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Gut microbiota en
dc.title Harnessing the bacteriocin-producing capacity of the gut with a view to controlling microorganisms that have been associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Science) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Restricted to everyone for five years en
dc.check.date 2022-10-03T09:00:44Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Microbiology en
dc.internal.school Teagasc en
dc.check.reason Releasing this thesis would cause substantial prejudice to the commercial interests of University College Cork en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
ucc.workflow.supervisor c.hill@ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Autumn 2017 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Principal Investigator Programme (PI)/11/PI/1137/IE/Obesibiotics/ en


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© 2017, James William Hegarty. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, James William Hegarty.
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