Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland

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dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M.
dc.contributor.author Moran, Joseph
dc.contributor.author Corcoran, Paul
dc.contributor.author O'Flynn, Siun
dc.contributor.author O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Aoife M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-18T09:40:13Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-18T09:40:13Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation O’Sullivan, D. M., Moran, J., Corcoran, P., O’Flynn, S., O’Tuathaigh, C. and O’Sullivan, A. M. (2017) 'Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland', BMJ Open, 7(7), e016076 (9pp). doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016076 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.issued 7
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 9
dc.identifier.issn 2044-6055
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4887
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016076
dc.description.abstract Objectives: To determine whether performance in any of the Health Professions Admissions Test (HPAT) sections, most specifically the interpersonal understanding section, correlates with self-reported empathy levels in medical students. Setting: The study was conducted in University College Cork, Ireland. Participants 290 students participated in the study. Matching HPAT scores were available for 263 students. All male and female undergraduate students were invited to participate. Postgraduate and international students were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary measures: HPAT-Ireland and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSE) scores were compared including subsection analysis. Secondary measures: comparisons were made between groups such as gender and year of programme. Results: A total of 290 students participated. Males scored significantly higher than females for total HPAT-Ireland (U=7329, z=−2.04, p<0.05), HPAT-Ireland section 1 (U=5382, z=−5.21, p<0.001) and section 3 scores (U=6833, z=−2.85, p<0.01). In contrast, females scored significantly higher than males on HPAT-Ireland section 2 (U=5844, z=−4.46, p<0.001). Females demonstrated significantly higher total JSE scores relative to males (mean score ± SEM: 113.33±1.05vs 109.21±0.95; U=8450, z=−2.83, p<0.01). No significant association was observed between JSE scores and any of the HPAT-Ireland measures (all p>0.05). There was no effect of programme year on JSE scores (all p>0.05). Conclusion: The introduction of the HPAT-Ireland test was partly designed to identify students with strong interpersonal skills. A significant finding of this study is that JSE values did not correlate with HPAT-Ireland scores. This study suggests no clear link between scores on a selection test, the HPAT-Ireland, which is designed to assess several skill domains including interpersonal skills, and scores on a psychometric measure of empathy, at any point during medical education. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/7/e016076
dc.rights © 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject Medical student en
dc.subject HPAT en
dc.subject Empathy levels en
dc.title Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aoife M O’Sullivan, Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: aoifemos89@gmail.com en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMJ Open en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress aoifemos89@gmail.com en
dc.identifier.articleid e016076


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© 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
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