Core fecal microbiota of domesticated herbivorous ruminant, hindgut fermenters, and monogastric animals

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dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Michelle M.
dc.contributor.author Harris, Hugh M. B.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-18T09:40:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-18T09:40:14Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation O'Donnell, M. M., Harris, H. M. B., Ross, R. P. and O'Toole, P. W. (2017) 'Core fecal microbiota of domesticated herbivorous ruminant, hindgut fermenters, and monogastric animals', Microbiology Open, e509 (11pp). doi: 10.1002/mbo3.509 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 11
dc.identifier.issn 2045-8827
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4895
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/mbo3.509
dc.description.abstract In this pilot study, we determined the core fecal microbiota composition and overall microbiota diversity of domesticated herbivorous animals of three digestion types: hindgut fermenters, ruminants, and monogastrics. The 42 animals representing 10 animal species were housed on a single farm in Ireland and all the large herbivores consumed similar feed, harmonizing two of the environmental factors that influence the microbiota. Similar to other mammals, the fecal microbiota of all these animals was dominated by the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. The fecal microbiota spanning all digestion types comprised 42% of the genera identified. Host phylogeny and, to a lesser extent, digestion type determined the microbiota diversity in these domesticated herbivores. This pilot study forms a platform for future studies into the microbiota of nonbovine and nonequine domesticated herbivorous animals. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.relation.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mbo3.509/abstract;jsessionid=7B2EA9D986A0EFDA906D583EA9243763.f04t04
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Diet en
dc.subject Herbivore en
dc.subject Hindgut en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.subject Monogastric en
dc.subject Ruminant en
dc.title Core fecal microbiota of domesticated herbivorous ruminant, hindgut fermenters, and monogastric animals en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul W. O'Toole, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Microbiology Open en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e509
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Principal Investigator Programme (PI)/07/IN.1/B1780/IE/Functional genomics of two commensal lactobacilli from humans and animals/


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© 2017, the Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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