Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and later-life depression: perceived social support as a potential protective factor

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dc.contributor.author Cheong, E. Von
dc.contributor.author Sinnott, Carol
dc.contributor.author Dahly, Darren L.
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-18T09:40:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-18T09:40:15Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Cheong, E. V., Sinnott, C., Dahly, D. and Kearney, P. M. (2017) 'Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and later-life depression: perceived social support as a potential protective factor', BMJ Open, 7(9), e013228 (12pp). doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013228 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.issued 9
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 12
dc.identifier.issn 2044-6055
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4897
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013228
dc.description.abstract Objective: To investigate associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and later-life depressive symptoms; and to explore whether perceived social support (PSS) moderates these. Method: We analysed baseline data from the Mitchelstown (Ireland) 2010–2011 cohort of 2047 men and women aged 50–69 years. Self-reported measures included ACEs (Centre for Disease Control ACE questionnaire), PSS (Oslo Social Support Scale) and depressive symptoms (CES-D). The primary exposure was self-report of at least one ACE. We also investigated the effects of ACE exposure by ACE scores and ACE subtypes abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. Associations between each of these exposures and depressive symptoms were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for socio-demographic factors. We tested whether the estimated associations varied across levels of PSS (poor, moderate and strong). Results: 23.7% of participants reported at least one ACE (95% CI 21.9% to 25.6%). ACE exposures (overall, subtype or ACE scores) were associated with a higher odds of depressive symptoms, but only among individuals with poor PSS. Exposure to any ACE (vs none) was associated with almost three times the odds of depressive symptoms (adjusted OR 2.85; 95% CI 1.64 to 4.95) among individuals reporting poor PSS, while among those reporting moderate and strong PSS, the adjusted ORs were 2.21 (95% CI 1.52 to 3.22) and 1.39 (95% CI 0.85 to 2.29), respectively. This pattern of results was similar when exposures were based on ACE subtype and ACE scores, though the interaction was clearly strongest among those reporting abuse. Conclusions: ACEs are common among older adults in Ireland and are associated with higher odds of later-life depressive symptoms, particularly among those with poor PSS. Interventions that enhance social support, or possibly perceptions of social support, may help reduce the burden of depression in older populations with ACE exposure, particularly in those reporting abuse. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (HRC/2007/13). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/9/e013228
dc.rights © 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject Adverse childhood experiences en
dc.subject ACE en
dc.subject PSS en
dc.subject Depression en
dc.title Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and later-life depression: perceived social support as a potential protective factor en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Patricia Kearney, Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMJ Open en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e013228


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© 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Article authors or their employer unless otherwise stated in the text of the Article. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
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