Learning strategies, study habits and social networking activity of undergraduate medical students

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dc.contributor.author Bickerdike, Andrea
dc.contributor.author O'Deasmhunaigh, Conall
dc.contributor.author O'Flynn, Siun
dc.contributor.author O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-08T13:33:49Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-08T13:33:49Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-17
dc.identifier.citation Bickerdike, A., O'Deasmhunaigh, C., O'Flynn, S. and O'Tuathaigh, C. (2016) 'Learning strategies, study habits and social networking activity of undergraduate medical students', International Journal of Medical Education, 7, pp. 230-236. doi: 10.5116/ijme.576f.d074 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.startpage 230
dc.identifier.endpage 236
dc.identifier.issn 2042-6372
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5160
dc.identifier.doi 10.5116/ijme.576f.d074
dc.description.abstract Objectives: To determine learning strategies, study habits, and online social networking use of undergraduates at an Irish medical school, and their relationship with academic performance. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Year 2 and final year undergraduate-entry and graduate-entry students at an Irish medical school. Data about participants’ demographics and educational background, study habits (including time management), and use of online media was collected using a self-report questionnaire. Participants’ learning strategies were measured using the 18-item Approaches to Learning and Studying Inventory (ALSI). Year score percentage was the measure of academic achievement. The association between demographic/educational factors, learning strategies, study habits, and academic achievement was statistically analysed using regression analysis. Results: Forty-two percent of students were included in this analysis (n=376). A last-minute “cramming” time management study strategy was associated with increased use of online social networks. Learning strategies differed between undergraduate- and graduate-entrants, with the latter less likely to adopt a ‘surface approach’ and more likely adopt a ‘study monitoring’ approach. Year score percentage was positively correlated with the ‘effort management/organised studying’ learning style. Poorer academic performance was associated with a poor time management approach to studying (“cramming”) and increased use of the ‘surface learning’ strategy. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that effort management and organised studying should be promoted, and surface learning discouraged, as part of any effort to optimise academic performance in medical school. Excessive use of social networking contributes to poor study habits, which are associated with reduced academic achievement en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher International Journal of Medical Education en
dc.relation.uri https://www.ijme.net/archive/7/learning-strategies-and-study-habits-of-medical-students/
dc.rights © 2016, Andrea Bickerdike et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use of work provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
dc.subject Learning strategy en
dc.subject Study habits en
dc.subject Social media en
dc.subject Academic performance en
dc.subject Mode of entry into medicine en
dc.title Learning strategies, study habits and social networking activity of undergraduate medical students en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Colm O'Tuathaigh, Medicine , University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.otuathaigh@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal of Medical Education en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.otuathaigh@ucc.ie en


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© 2016, Andrea Bickerdike et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use of work provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Andrea Bickerdike et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use of work provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
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