Transplantation of novel human GDF5-expressing CHO cells is neuroprotective in models of Parkinson's disease

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dc.contributor.author Costello, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.author O'Keeffe, Gerard W.
dc.contributor.author Hurley, Fiona M.
dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Aideen M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-14T10:17:23Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-14T10:17:23Z
dc.date.issued 2012-09-26
dc.identifier.citation Costello, D. J., O'Keeffe, G. W., Hurley, F. M. and Sullivan, A. M. (2012) ‘Transplantation of novel human GDF5-expressing CHO cells is neuroprotective in models of Parkinson's disease’, Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 16(10), pp. 2451-2460. doi:10.1111/j.1582-4934.2012.01562.x en
dc.identifier.volume 16 en
dc.identifier.issued 10 en
dc.identifier.startpage 2451 en
dc.identifier.endpage 2460 en
dc.identifier.issn 1582-4934
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5175
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2012.01562.x
dc.description.abstract Growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) is a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo and as such is potentially useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study shows that a continuous supply of GDF5, produced by transplanted GDF5-overexpressing CHO cells in vivo, has neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on midbrain dopaminergic neurons following 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of the adult rat nigrostriatal pathway. It also increases the survival and improves the function of transplanted embryonic dopaminergic neurons in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. This study provides the first proof-of-principle that sustained delivery of GDF5 in vivo may be useful in the treatment of PD. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2012, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Growth/differentiation factor 5 en
dc.subject Neurotrophic factor en
dc.subject Parkinson's disease en
dc.subject Neurodegeneration en
dc.subject Dopamine en
dc.title Transplantation of novel human GDF5-expressing CHO cells is neuroprotective in models of Parkinson's disease en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Daniel Costello, Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: daniel.costello@hse.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-12-07T09:46:11Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 419813859
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Daniel.Costello@hse.ie en


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© 2012, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2012, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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