Techno-economic analysis of biogas upgrading via amine scrubber, carbon capture and ex-situ methanation

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dc.contributor.author Vo, Truc T. Q.
dc.contributor.author Wall, David M.
dc.contributor.author Ring, Denis
dc.contributor.author Rajendran, Karthik
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Jerry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-12T11:39:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-12T11:39:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018-01-08
dc.identifier.citation Vo, T. T. Q., Wall, D. M., Ring, D., Rajendran, K. and Murphy, J. D. (2018) 'Techno-economic analysis of biogas upgrading via amine scrubber, carbon capture and ex-situ methanation', Applied Energy, 212, pp. 1191-1202. doi: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.12.099 en
dc.identifier.volume 212 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1191 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1202 en
dc.identifier.issn 0306-2619
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5271
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.12.099
dc.description.abstract Biogas upgraded to biomethane can provide a renewable gaseous transport fuel and is one of the proposed solutions in meeting the renewable energy supply in transport targets set under the EU Renewable Energy Directive. The upgrading process for biogas involves the removal of CO2. Amine scrubbing is one traditional method of upgrading that is applied due to its low methane slippage and its capability to provide a high purity renewable methane product. However, new technologies such as power to gas (P2G) can also upgrade biogas through biological methanation by combining the CO2 in biogas with H2 to produce renewable methane. The H2 for P2G can be produced through electrolysis of renewable electricity. Through simulation software – SuperPro Designer, the economics of different pathways for upgrading biogas from a grass silage and slurry fed digester are analysed and compared in this paper. Three scenarios were investigated: biogas upgrading through amine scrubbing (scenario 1); biogas upgrading through amine scrubbing with CO2 directed to ex-situ biological methanation (scenario 2) and biogas upgrading through ex-situ biological methanation only (scenario 3). The results show that at a net present value of zero, the minimum selling price (MSP) per m3 of renewable methane for scenario 1, 2 and 3 is €0.76; €1.50 and €1.43, respectively (with an electricity price to produce H2 of €0.10/kWh and a grass silage production cost of €27/t). The electricity price has a significant effect on the cost of renewable methane in both scenarios 2 and 3. The MSP reduces to €1.09 and €1.00 per m3 of renewable methane, respectively for scenarios 2 and 3, if the electricity price is reduced to €0.05/kWh. Since the renewable methane MSP from scenario 2 is higher than scenario 3, it is suggested that direct biogas injection to the methanation reactor is financially more attractive than capturing CO2 from biogas and feeding it to the methanation step. The MSP of renewable methane from both scenarios 2 and 3 are significantly higher than that of scenario 1. However, when considering climate change mitigation, balancing of the electricity network and storage of surplus electricity, utilising P2G can offset some of these costs. The cost of H2 is a significant factor in determining the cost of renewable methane. en
dc.description.sponsorship Gas Networks Ireland (GNI through the Gas Innovation Group and ERVIA) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306261917318226
dc.rights © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject CO2 capture en
dc.subject Process simulation en
dc.subject Amine scrubber en
dc.subject Methanation en
dc.subject Biological power to gas en
dc.subject Economic analysis en
dc.title Techno-economic analysis of biogas upgrading via amine scrubber, carbon capture and ex-situ methanation en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Karthik Rajendran, Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland T: +353 21 490 3000 Email: k.rajendran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-01-08
dc.date.updated 2018-01-12T11:30:30Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 421497191
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Gas Networks Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Applied Energy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.rajendran@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2302/IE/Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) - The SFI Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Research/ en


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© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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