Place, community and organisation on the Courtown Estates, 1649-1977

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dc.contributor.advisor Geary, Laurence M. en
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-22T12:18:11Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.date.submitted 2017
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, R. 2017. Place, community and organisation on the Courtown Estates, 1649-1977. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5307
dc.description.abstract The thesis examines the significance of place in transnational estate studies. It proposes that the landed estate is simultaneously a place, a community and an organisation, and that the interaction of these three elements shapes the events that occur there. It takes the Courtown estate as a case study which, in the nineteenth century, consisted of 23,000 acres in Carlow, Cheshire and Wexford, arranged into seven estates. The thesis is a comparative study of four of the estates, drawing on estate papers, valuation records and census returns and reports. Information has been analysed using traditional and digital research techniques. The thesis commences with a discussion of the evolution of the Courtown estate from 1649 to 1858, examining the ways in which land was acquired. The following three chapters focus on place, community and organisation respectively during the period 1858-1914 when the estate was under fifth earl of Courtown’s stewardship. Analysis shows that each estate had a distinct character in terms of place and community, and that estate administration was often adapted accordingly. There follows a detailed comparison of key themes, such as evictions and landlord-tenant relationships, across the four estates. This highlights variances between the individual estates, even when located in close proximity. The thesis shows that a more nuanced understanding of a landed estate can be achieved by analysing all locations within it, their relation to each other, and to the estate as a whole. It also demonstrates that the characteristics of the core estate are not necessarily reflected in the subsidiary estates. Finally, it shows that place, in combination with community and organisation, plays a role in shaping historical events. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2017, Rachel Murphy. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Courtown en
dc.subject Wexford en
dc.subject Carlow en
dc.subject Cheshire en
dc.subject Landed estate en
dc.subject Place en
dc.subject Community en
dc.subject Organisation en
dc.subject Agent en
dc.subject Stopford en
dc.title Place, community and organisation on the Courtown Estates, 1649-1977 en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral Degree (Structured) en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Arts) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Restricted to everyone for five years en
dc.check.date 2023-01-21T12:18:11Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school History en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
ucc.workflow.supervisor l.geary@ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Autumn 2015 en


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© 2017, Rachel Murphy. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Rachel Murphy.
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