Targeting transcriptional regulators to regenerate midbrain dopaminergic axons in Parkinson's disease

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hegarty, Shane V.
dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Aideen M.
dc.contributor.author O'Keeffe, Gerard W.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-06T13:36:27Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-06T13:36:27Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Hegarty, S., Sullivan, A., and O'Keeffe, G. W. (2017) 'Targeting transcriptional regulators to regenerate midbrain dopaminergic axons in Parkinson's disease', Neural Regeneration Research, 12(11), pp. 1814-1815 doi: 10.4103/1673-5374.219039 en
dc.identifier.volume 12
dc.identifier.issued 11
dc.identifier.startpage 1814
dc.identifier.endpage 1815
dc.identifier.issn 1673-5374
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5380
dc.identifier.doi 10.4103/1673-5374.219039
dc.description.abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, age-related neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1–2% of the population over the age of 65. PD is characterised by the progressive degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons. This leads to disabling motor symptoms, due to the striatal DA denervation. Despite decades of research, there is still no therapy that can slow, stop or regenerate the dying midbrain DA neurons in PD. Current drug treatment regimes typically involve dopamine-replacement strategies. While these are effective in controlling the symptoms for several years, they do not attenuate the progressive neurodegeneration. There is now robust evidence that retrograde degeneration of nigrostriatal axons occurs early in PD pathogenesis, and precedes neuronal loss (Kordower et al., 2013). Therefore, a promising approach for restoring motor function in PD patients may be to develop strategies which regenerate nigrostriatal DA axons, so that they can re-establish their lost connections [Figure 1]. To address this, investigation of the potential for reactivation of the intrinsic axon growth capacity of midbrain DA neurons is needed. Information on the molecular mechanisms regulating nigrostriatal DA axonal growth and target innervation during their normal development will provide novel targets for axon regenerative therapy in PD en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (R15897); National University of Ireland (R16189); Royal Irish Academy (SVH/AMS/GWO'K) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Medknow Publications en
dc.relation.uri http://www.nrronline.org/article.asp?issn=1673-5374;year=2017;volume=12;issue=11;spage=1814;epage=1815;aulast=Hegarty
dc.rights © 2017, Medknow Publications. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under identical terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ie/
dc.subject Parkinson’s disease en
dc.subject Axons en
dc.subject Axon regenerative therapy en
dc.subject Dopaminergic axons en
dc.title Targeting transcriptional regulators to regenerate midbrain dopaminergic axons in Parkinson's disease en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother g.okeeffe@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000417880400017
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Royal Irish Academy
dc.contributor.funder National University of Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Neural Regeneration Research en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Gerard O'Keeffe, Anatomy & Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: g.okeeffe@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Career Development Award/15/CDA/3498/IE/Development of GDF5 neurotrophic factor therapy for Parkinson_s disease./


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2017, Medknow Publications. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under identical terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Medknow Publications. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under identical terms.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement