Bile acids at the cross-roads of gut microbiome–host cardiometabolic interactions

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dc.contributor.author Ryan, Paul M.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Caplice, Noel M.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-06T13:36:29Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-06T13:36:29Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Ryan, P. M., Stanton, C. and Caplice, N. M. (2017) 'Bile acids at the cross-roads of gut microbiome–host cardiometabolic interactions', Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, 9(1), 102 (12pp). doi: 10.1186/s13098-017-0299-9 en
dc.identifier.volume 9
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5402
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s13098-017-0299-9
dc.description.abstract While basic and clinical research over the last several decades has recognized a number of modifiable risk factors associated with cardiometabolic disease progression, additional and alternative biological perspectives may offer novel targets for prevention and treatment of this disease set. There is mounting preclinical and emerging clinical evidence indicating that the mass of metabolically diverse microorganisms which inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract may be implicated in initiation and modulation of cardiovascular and metabolic disease outcomes. The following review will discuss this gut microbiome–host metabolism axis and address newly proposed bile-mediated signaling pathways through which dysregulation of this homeostatic axis may influence host cardiovascular risk. With a central focus on the major nuclear and membrane-bound bile acid receptor ligands, we aim to review the putative impact of microbial bile acid modification on several major phenotypes of metabolic syndrome, from obesity to heart failure. Finally, attempting to synthesize several separate but complementary hypotheses, we will review current directions in preclinical and clinical investigation in this evolving field. en
dc.description.sponsorship Enterprise Ireland (CF/2013/3030A/B). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri https://dmsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13098-017-0299-9
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Bile acids en
dc.subject Cardiovascular disease en
dc.subject Metabolic syndrome en
dc.title Bile acids at the cross-roads of gut microbiome–host cardiometabolic interactions en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother n.caplice@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Enterprise Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Noel Caplice, Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: n.caplice@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 102
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/


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© 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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