Assessment of existing layperson knowledge on the role and use of AEDs in amateur sports clubs: a systematic review of the literature

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dc.contributor.author Ryan, Paul
dc.contributor.author Falvey, Éanna
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-06T13:36:30Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-06T13:36:30Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Ryan, P. and Falvey, É. (2017) 'Assessment of existing layperson knowledge on the role and use of AEDs in amateur sports clubs: a systematic review of the literature'. 24(1). pp. 17-34. doi: 10.2218/resmedica.v24i1.1470 en
dc.identifier.volume 24
dc.identifier.issued 1
dc.identifier.startpage 17
dc.identifier.endpage 34
dc.identifier.issn 0482-3206
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5410
dc.identifier.doi 10.2218/resmedica.v24i1.1470
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Global incidence of out-of-hospital SCA ranges from 20–140 in 100 000 people, and survival ranges from 2–11%. The large increase in the distribution and availability of automated external defibrillators (AED) has led to increasing interest into layperson recognition of and response to SCA. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper is to systematically review previously conducted studies relating to knowledge, understanding and attitudes among laypersons in relation to the use of an AED in the event of an SCA. This review aims to assess and critically appraise the existing literature relating to this topic on an international level in order to identify future research directions. METHODS: Studies were identified through an electronic database search in combination with expert recommendation. This process identified a total of 37 papers, which were screened and assessed for eligibility. A three-step selection process was applied to determine applicability to this review. A total of 10 studies were finally deemed eligible for inclusion in this qualitative synthesis. RESULTS: Ten studies were reviewed and critiqued. Three themes emerged: 1. Knowledge and understanding of the concept of AEDs 2. Willingness to use an AED in the event of an SCA 3. Reasons for unwillingness to use an AED in the event of an SCA. Results were compiled, summarized and discussed. CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of literature relating to layperson understanding of AED function and use. The evidence suggests that only a minority of laypersons would be confident or willing to use an AED in the event of a nearby SCA. The extent to which an educational intervention could impact upon layperson understanding and confidence in the use of an AED is poorly understood at present. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Royal Medical Society en
dc.rights © 2017, Res Medica. All rights reserved. Res Medica is an Open Access journal. All material is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject AED en
dc.subject Layperson en
dc.subject Public en
dc.subject Understanding en
dc.subject Attitudes en
dc.subject Knowledge en
dc.title Assessment of existing layperson knowledge on the role and use of AEDs in amateur sports clubs: a systematic review of the literature en
dc.type Review en
dc.internal.authorcontactother eannafalvey.sportsphysician@gmail.com en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Res Medica en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Éanna Falvey, Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: +353 21 490 300 Email: eanna.falvey@ucc.ie en


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© 2017, Res Medica. All rights reserved. Res Medica is an Open Access journal. All material is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Res Medica. All rights reserved. Res Medica is an Open Access journal. All material is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence, unless otherwise stated.
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