Use of surplus wind electricity in Ireland to produce compressed renewable gaseous transport fuel through biological power to gas systems

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dc.contributor.author Vo, Truc T. Q.
dc.contributor.author Xia, Ao
dc.contributor.author Wall, David M.
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Jerry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-19T19:10:18Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-19T19:10:18Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-31
dc.identifier.citation Vo, T. T. Q., Xia, A., Wall, D. M. and Murphy, J. D. (2016) 'Use of surplus wind electricity in Ireland to produce compressed renewable gaseous transport fuel through biological power to gas systems', Renewable Energy, 105, pp. 495-504. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2016.12.084 en
dc.identifier.volume 105 en
dc.identifier.startpage 495 en
dc.identifier.endpage 504 en
dc.identifier.issn 0960-1481
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5486
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.renene.2016.12.084
dc.description.abstract Power to gas (P2G) may be used to store curtailed electricity whilst converting the energy vector to gas. To be economically viable these systems require cheap electricity and a cheap concentrated source of CO2. Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion typically comprises of 60% methane and 40% CO2. The P2G system substitutes for the conventional upgrading system by using hydrogen (derived from surplus wind electricity) to react with CO2 and increases the methane output. The potential CO2 production from biogas in Ireland associated with typical wet substrates is assessed as more than 4 times greater than that required by the potential level of H2 from curtailed electricity. Wind energy curtailment in 2020 in Ireland is assessed conservatively at 2175GWeh/a. Thus P2G is limited by levels of curtailment of electricity rather than biogas systems. It is shown that 1 GWeh of electricity used to produce H2 for upgrading biogas in a P2G system can affect a savings of 97 tonnes CO2. The cost of hydrogen is assessed at €0.96/m3 renewable methane when the price of electricity is €c5/kWeh. This leads to a cost of compressed renewable gas from grass of €1.8/m3. This drops to €1.1/m3 when electricity is purchased at €c0.2/kWeh. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2016, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Biological power to gas en
dc.subject Greenhouse gas emission en
dc.subject Green gas en
dc.subject Biomethane en
dc.subject Biofuel cost en
dc.subject Seaweed en
dc.title Use of surplus wind electricity in Ireland to produce compressed renewable gaseous transport fuel through biological power to gas systems en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2018-12-31
dc.date.updated 2018-02-13T13:32:43Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 425602929
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Ervia, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Gas Networks Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Renewable Energy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Jerry.Murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2302/IE/Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) - The SFI Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Research/ en


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© 2016, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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