Neither action nor phonological video games make dyslexic children read better

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dc.contributor.author Łuniewska, Magdalena
dc.contributor.author Chyl, Katarzyna
dc.contributor.author Dębska, Agnieszka
dc.contributor.author Kacprzak, Agnieszka
dc.contributor.author Plewko, Joanna
dc.contributor.author Szczerbinski, Marcin
dc.contributor.author Szewczyk, Jakub
dc.contributor.author Grabowska, Anna
dc.contributor.author Jednoróg, Katarzyna
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-20T13:24:12Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-20T13:24:12Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Łuniewska, M., Chyl, K., Dębska, A., Kacprzak, A., Plewko, J., Szczerbiński, M., Szewczyk, J., Grabowska, A. and Jednoróg, K. (2018) 'Neither action nor phonological video games make dyslexic children read better', Scientific Reports, 8(1), 549 (11pp). doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-18878-7 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 11
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5500
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-017-18878-7
dc.description.abstract The prevalence and long-term consequences of dyslexia make it crucial to look for effective and efficient ways of its therapy. Action video games (AVG) were implied as a possible remedy for difficulties in reading in Italian and English-speaking children. However, the studies examining the effectiveness of AVG application in dyslexia suffered from significant methodological weaknesses such as small sample sizes and lack of a control group with no intervention. In our study, we tested how two forms of training: based on AVG and on phonological non-action video games (PNAVG), affect reading in a group of fifty-four Polish children with dyslexia. Both speed and accuracy of reading increased in AVG as much as in PNAVG group. Moreover, both groups improved in phonological awareness, selective attention and rapid naming. Critically, the reading progress in the two groups did not differ from a dyslexic control group which did not participate in any training. Thus, the observed improvement in reading in AVG and PNAVG can be attributed either to the normal reading development related to schooling or to test practice effect. Overall, we failed to replicate previous studies: Neither AVG nor PNAVG remedy difficulties in reading in school children. en
dc.description.sponsorship Narodowe Centrum Nauki (UMO-2014/14/A/HS6/00294) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-18878-7
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Human behaviour en
dc.subject Neurodevelopmental disorders en
dc.title Neither action nor phonological video games make dyslexic children read better en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Marcin Szczerbinski, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.szczerbinski@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Narodowe Centrum Nauki
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.szczerbinski@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 549


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© 2018, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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