Role-play in literature lectures: the students’ assessment of their learning

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dc.contributor.author Ryan, Isobel E.
dc.contributor.author Dawson, Ciarán
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Marian
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-09T12:55:06Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-09T12:55:06Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Ryan, Isobel E.; Dawson, Ciarán; and McCarthy, Marian (2018) 'Role-play in literature lectures: the students’ assessment of their learning,' International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: 12(1), 8 (9pp). doi: 10.20429/ijsotl.2018.120108 en
dc.identifier.volume 12
dc.identifier.issued 1
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 9
dc.identifier.issn 1931‐4744
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5601
dc.identifier.doi 10.20429/ijsotl.2018.120108
dc.description.abstract The following article is based on a piece of qualitative research on the use of role-play in a literature module in the Modern Irish Dept. of University College Cork in 2015. There were 18 students involved in the research. The aim of the research was to establish what value students associate with the use of role-play in literature lectures. Role-play is used widely in language classes but less widely in literature lectures. Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs); questionnaires; a focus group; and essays were used as a means of gathering data. The research findings indicate that students are nervous when first presented with the prospect of doing role-play in class; however, the findings show that these feelings soon give way to a happy acceptance of role-play and an appreciation of this teaching methodology as beneficial to both teaching and learning. The students who took part in the study were very enthusiastic about the group work involved in preparing and performing role-play. While the author recognises that role-play may not lend itself to all teaching contexts, she wishes to encourage other literature teachers to experiment with role-play. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Georgia Southern University Centers for Teaching & Technology en
dc.relation.uri https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/ij-sotl/vol12/iss1/8/
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Role-play en
dc.subject Teaching and learning en
dc.subject Action research en
dc.subject Literature lectures en
dc.title Role-play in literature lectures: the students’ assessment of their learning en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Marian McCarthy, Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: mmccarthy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning en
dc.identifier.articleid 8


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© 2018, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.
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