Life cycle assessment of seaweed biomethane, generated from seaweed sourced from integrated multi-trophic aquaculture in temperate oceanic climates

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Czyrnek-Delêtre, Magdalena M.
dc.contributor.author Rocca, Stefania
dc.contributor.author Agostini, Alessandro
dc.contributor.author Giuntoli, Jacopo
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Jerry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-20T10:16:40Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-20T10:16:40Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-05
dc.identifier.citation Czyrnek-Delêtre, M. M., Rocca, S., Agostini, A., Giuntoli, J. and Murphy, J. D. (2017) 'Life cycle assessment of seaweed biomethane, generated from seaweed sourced from integrated multi-trophic aquaculture in temperate oceanic climates', Applied Energy, 196, pp.34-50. doi: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.03.129 en
dc.identifier.volume 196 en
dc.identifier.startpage 34 en
dc.identifier.endpage 50 en
dc.identifier.issn 0306-2619
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5632
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.03.129
dc.description.abstract Biomethane produced from seaweed is a third generation renewable gaseous fuel. The advantage of seaweed for biofuel is that it does not compete directly or indirectly for land with food, feed or fibre production. Furthermore, the integration of seaweed and salmon farming can increase the yield of seaweed per hectare, while reducing the eutrophication from fish farming. So far, full comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of seaweed biofuel are scarce in the literature; current studies focus mainly on microalgal biofuels. The focus of this study is an assessment of the sustainability of seaweed biomethane, with seaweed sourced from an integrated seaweed and salmon farm in a north Atlantic island, namely Ireland. With this goal in mind, an attributional LCA principle was applied to analyse a seaweed biofuel system. The environmental impact categories assessed are: climate change, acidification, and marine, terrestrial and freshwater eutrophication. The seaweed Laminaria digitata is digested to produce biogas upgraded to natural gas standard, before being used as a transport biofuel. The baseline scenario shows high emissions in all impact categories. An optimal seaweed biomethane system can achieve 70% savings in GHG emissions as compared to gasoline with high yields per hectare, optimum seaweed composition and proper digestate management. Seaweed harvested in August proved to have higher methane yield. August seaweed biomethane delivers 22% lower impacts than biomethane from seaweed harvested in October. Seaweed characteristics are more significant for improvement of biomethane sustainability than an increase in seaweed yield per unit area. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Seaweed en
dc.subject Biomethane en
dc.subject Anaerobic digestion en
dc.subject Life cycle assessment en
dc.subject LCA en
dc.subject Wastewater en
dc.subject Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture en
dc.subject IMTA en
dc.title Life cycle assessment of seaweed biomethane, generated from seaweed sourced from integrated multi-trophic aquaculture in temperate oceanic climates en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this item is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-04-05
dc.date.updated 2018-03-06T09:50:04Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 428512767
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Gas Networks Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Ervia, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder B9 Energy Group, Northern Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Applied Energy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Jerry.Murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres Supplement/12/RC/2302s/IE/Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) - EU Grant Manager/ en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND license.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement