Dream machines

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dc.contributor.author Connor, Steven
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-20T15:46:26Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-20T15:46:26Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Connor, S. (2017). Dream Machines. London: Open Humanities Press. en
dc.identifier.endpage 216
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-78542-036-8
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-78542-037-5
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5670
dc.description.abstract Dream Machines is a history of imaginary machines and the ways in which machines come to be imagined. It considers seven different kinds of speculative, projected or impossible machine: machines for teleportation, dream-production, sexual pleasure and medical treatment and cure, along with ‘influencing machines’, invisibility machines and perpetual motion machines. The process of imagining ideal or impossible forms of machinery tends backwards or inwards, allowing a way for imagination itelf to be conceived as a kind of machinery, or ingenious engineering. Machines suggest to us ways of imagining the machinery we take ourselves to be, the workings not only of immune systems and neural networks, but also of dreams, desires and aspirations. This reflexivity means that representations of machines are always suffused with intense feeling. The larger aim of Dream Machines is to isolate a strain of the visionary that may be involved in all thinking and writing about machines. An imaginary machine may also be a way of imagining other kinds of thing that a machine can do and be. This is the sense in which all machines may in fact be said to be forms of media; for we have always dreamed of and with machines, always therefore dreaming through the machines we have been dreaming about. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Open Humanities Press en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Technographies
dc.relation.uri https://openhumanitiespress.org/
dc.rights © 2017, Steven Connor. This is an open access book, licensed under Creative Commons By Attribution Share Alike license. Under this license, authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy their work so long as the authors and source are cited and resulting derivative works are licensed under the same or similar license. No permission is required from the authors or the publisher. Statutory fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above. Read more about the license at creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0 en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/
dc.subject Imaginary machine en
dc.subject Teleportation en
dc.subject Dream-production en
dc.subject Sexual pleasure en
dc.subject Medical treatment en
dc.title Dream machines en
dc.type Book en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.internal.placepublication London en


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© 2017, Steven Connor. This is an open access book, licensed under Creative Commons By Attribution Share Alike license. Under this license, authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy their work so long as the authors and source are cited and resulting derivative works are licensed under the same or similar license. No permission is required from the authors or the publisher. Statutory fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above. Read more about the license at creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0 Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Steven Connor. This is an open access book, licensed under Creative Commons By Attribution Share Alike license. Under this license, authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy their work so long as the authors and source are cited and resulting derivative works are licensed under the same or similar license. No permission is required from the authors or the publisher. Statutory fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above. Read more about the license at creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0
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