Exploring racial politics, personal history and critical reception: Clarence Brown's Intruder in the Dust (1949)

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Young, Gwenda
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-18T09:17:12Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-18T09:17:12Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Young, G. (2013) 'Exploring racial politics, personal history and critical reception: Clarence Brown's Intruder in the Dust (1949)', Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, 6. en
dc.identifier.issued 6
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 18
dc.identifier.issn 2009-4078
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5802
dc.description.abstract Using archival sources from the Clarence Brown Archive at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, newspaper clippings from a wide range of national and regional press, and unpublished interviews, this article explores how the complexities and contradictions that are central to Clarence Brown’s film version of Intruder in the Dust (1949)—complexities that, arguably, make this film the most ambiguous of all the “race issue” films released in 1949—are mirrored in the director’s own deeply divided attitude to race and to the South. These tensions also surface in the critical reception of the film in the white press, and perhaps more tellingly, in the black press of 1949. The notion that this was a film generally acclaimed in the black press can be challenged, or at the very least nuanced, through a closer examination of newspaper archives, which, in turn, reveals some of the divisions within black intellectual circles of the late 1940s. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Film and Screen Media, University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://www.alphavillejournal.com/Issue6/HTML/ArticleYoung.html
dc.rights © 2013, The Author(s) en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Clarence Brown en
dc.subject Race en
dc.subject Tension en
dc.subject Ambiguous en
dc.title Exploring racial politics, personal history and critical reception: Clarence Brown's Intruder in the Dust (1949) en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gwenda Young, English, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: g.young@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.young@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2013, The Author(s) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013, The Author(s)
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement