Development of an ex vivo method for multi-unit recording of microbiota-colonic-neural signaling in real time

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dc.contributor.author Buckley, Maria M.
dc.contributor.author O'Malley, Dervla
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-02T10:16:23Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-02T10:16:23Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Buckley, M. M. and O'Malley, D. (2018) 'Development of an ex vivo method for multi-unit recording of microbiota-colonic-neural signaling in real time', Frontiers in Neuroscience, 12, 112 (8pp). doi: 10.3389/fnins.2018.00112 en
dc.identifier.volume 12
dc.identifier.issn 1662-453X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5936
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fnins.2018.00112
dc.description.abstract Background and Objectives: Bidirectional signaling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is vital for maintaining whole-body homeostasis. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates vagal afferent signaling in the modulation of host physiology by microbes, which are most abundant in the colon. This study aims to optimize and advance dissection and recording techniques to facilitate real-time recordings of afferent neural signals originating in the distal colon. New Protocol: This paper describes a dissection technique, which facilitates extracellular electrophysiological recordings from visceral pelvic, spinal and vagal afferent neurons in response to stimulation of the distal colon. Examples of Application: Focal application of 75 mM KCl to a section of distal colon with exposed submucosal or myenteric nerve cell bodies and sensory nerve endings evoked activity in the superior mesenteric plexus and the vagal nerve. Noradrenaline stimulated nerve activity in the superior mesenteric plexus, whereas application of carbachol stimulated vagal nerve activity. Exposure of an ex vivo section of distal colon with an intact colonic mucosa to peptidoglycan, but not lipopolysaccharide, evoked vagal nerve firing. Discussion: Previous studies have recorded vagal signaling evoked by bacteria in the small intestine. The technical advances of this dissection and recording technique facilitates recording of afferent nerve signals evoked in extrinsic sensory pathways by neuromodulatory reagents applied to the distal colon. Moreover, we have demonstrated vagal afferent activation evoked by bacterial products applied to the distal colonic mucosa. This protocol may contribute to our understanding of functional bowel disorders where gut-brain communication is dysfunctional, and facilitate real-time interrogation of microbiota-gut-brain signaling. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (108228/Z/15/Z). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media SA en
dc.relation.uri https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2018.00112/full
dc.rights © 2018, O'Malley and Buckley. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Vagus en
dc.subject Microbiota-gut-brain axis en
dc.subject Extracellular electrophysiology en
dc.subject Microdissection en
dc.subject Distal colon en
dc.title Development of an ex vivo method for multi-unit recording of microbiota-colonic-neural signaling in real time en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Dervla O'Malley, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.omalley@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Wellcome Trust
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Neuroscience en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.omalley@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 112


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© 2018, O'Malley and Buckley. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, O'Malley and Buckley. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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