Amniotic fluid C-reactive protein as a predictor of infection in caesarean section: a feasibility study

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dc.contributor.author Marchocki, Zbigniew
dc.contributor.author Vinturache, Angela
dc.contributor.author Collins, Kevin
dc.contributor.author O'Reilly, Paddy
dc.contributor.author O'Donoghue, Keelin
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-31T11:56:26Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-31T11:56:26Z
dc.identifier.citation Marchocki, Z., Vinturache, A., Collins, K., O’ Reilly, P. and O’Donoghue, K. (2018) 'Amniotic fluid C-reactive protein as a predictor of infection in caesarean section: a feasibility study', Scientific Reports, 8, 6372 (10pp). doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-24569-8 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.issued 2018
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 10
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6214
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-018-24569-8
dc.description.abstract This study evaluated the feasibility of maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) in amniotic fluid (AF) as a predictor of post-partum infection in women who undergo emergency or elective caesarean section (CS). AF bacterial culture and levels of hs-CRP in maternal serum and AF were evaluated in Day 0 and three days thereafter (Day 3) in 79 women undergoing CS. Univariate analyses assessed the clinical and demographic characteristics, whereas the ROC curves assessed the feasibility of hs-CRP as marker of inflammation in women who undergo CS. There was no difference in AF, Day 0, and Day 3 serum hs-CRP levels between women with sterile compared to those with bacterial growth in AF. Among women with positive AF cultures, AF and Day 0 serum hs-CRP levels were higher in women who underwent emergency compared to those who had elective CS (p = 0.04, and p = 0.02 respectively). hs-CRP in Day 0 and Day 3 serum but not in AF has a fair predictor value of infection in emergency CS only (AUC 0.767; 95% CI 0.606-0.928, and AUC 0.791; 95% CI 0.645-0.036, respectively). We conclude that AF hs-CRP is not feasible in assessing the risk of post-cesarean inflammation or infection. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-24569-8
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Predictive markers en
dc.subject Pregnancy outcome en
dc.title Amniotic fluid C-reactive protein as a predictor of infection in caesarean section: a feasibility study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Keelin O'Donoghue, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.odonoghue@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.odonoghue@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 6372


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© 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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