Prevalence and correlates of central venous catheter use among haemodialysis patients in the Irish health system - a national study

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dc.contributor.author Hussein, Wael F.
dc.contributor.author Mohammed, Husham
dc.contributor.author Browne, Leonard
dc.contributor.author Plant, Liam
dc.contributor.author Stack, Austin G.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-15T11:47:06Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-15T11:47:06Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Hussein, W. F., Mohammed, H., Browne, L., Plant, L. and Stack, A. G. (2018) 'Prevalence and correlates of central venous catheter use among haemodialysis patients in the Irish health system - a national study', BMC Nephrology, 19, 76 (9pp). doi: 10.1186/s12882-018-0873-x en
dc.identifier.volume 19
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 9
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2369
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6314
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12882-018-0873-x
dc.description.abstract Background: Central venous catheters (CVC) are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD), yet they are frequently used as the primary vascular access for many patients on HD. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and variation in CVC use across centres in the Irish health system. Methods: Data from the National Kidney Disease Clinical Patient Management System (KDCPMS) was used to determine CVC use and patterns across centres. Data on demographic characteristics, primary cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), comorbid conditions, laboratory values and centre affiliation were extracted for adult HD patients (n = 1, 196) who were on dialysis for at least three months up to end of December 2016. Correlates of CVC use were explored using multivariable logistic regression. Results: Overall prevalence of CVC use was 54% and varied significantly across clinical sites from 43% to 73%, P < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the likelihood of CVC use was lower with increasing dialysis vintage, OR 0.40 (0.26-0.60) for 4 years vs 1 year vintage, rising serum albumin, OR 0.73 (0.59-0.90) per 5 g/L), and with cystic disease as a cause of ESKD, OR 0.38 (95% CI 0.21-0.6). In contrast, catheter use was greater for women than men, OR 1.77 (1.34-2.34) and for 2 out of 10 regional dialysis centres, OR 1.98 (1.02-3.84) and OR 2.86 (1.67-4.90) respectively compared to referent group). Conclusions: Catheters are the predominant type of vascular access in patients undergoing HD in the Irish health system. Substantial centre variation exists which is not explained by patient-level characteristics. en
dc.description.sponsorship University of Limerick (Graduate Entry Medical School) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri https://bmcnephrol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12882-018-0873-x
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Haemodialysis en
dc.subject Access en
dc.subject Arteriovenous fistula en
dc.subject Central venous catheter en
dc.subject Tunnelled dialysis catheter en
dc.title Prevalence and correlates of central venous catheter use among haemodialysis patients in the Irish health system - a national study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Liam Plant, Renal Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder University of Limerick
dc.description.status Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Nephrology en
dc.identifier.articleid 76


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© 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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