The Bacteroidales produce an N-acylated derivative of glycine with both cholesterol-solubilising and hemolytic activity

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dc.contributor.author Lynch, Alli
dc.contributor.author Crowley, Elaine
dc.contributor.author Casey, Eoghan
dc.contributor.author Cano, Rafael
dc.contributor.author Shanahan, Rachel
dc.contributor.author McGlacken, Gerard P.
dc.contributor.author Marchesi, Julian R.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, David J.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-15T11:47:17Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-15T11:47:17Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Lynch, A., Crowley, E., Casey, E., Cano, R., Shanahan, R., McGlacken, G., Marchesi, J. R. and Clarke, D. J. (2017) 'The Bacteroidales produce an N-acylated derivative of glycine with both cholesterol-solubilising and hemolytic activity', Scientific Reports, 7(1), 13270 (10pp). doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-13774-6 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 10
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6349
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-017-13774-6
dc.description.abstract The contribution of the gut microbiota to the metabolism of cholesterol is not well understood. In this study, we identify 21 fosmid clones from a human gut microbiome metagenomic library that, when expressed in Escherichia coli, produce halos on LB agar supplemented with 0.01% (w/v) cholesterol (LBC agar). Analysis of 14 of these clones revealed that they all share a fragment of DNA with homology to the genome of Bacteroides vulgatus. The gene responsible for halo production on LBC agar, named choA, was identified as an N-acyltransferase known to produce an acylated glycine molecule called commendamide. In this study we show that commendamide is capable of producing a halo on LBC agar suggesting that this molecule is solubilizing the cholesterol micelles in LBC agar. We also show that commendamide is responsible for the previously described hemolytic activity associated with the choA orthologue in Bacteroides fragilis. A functional analysis of ChoA identified 2 amino acids that are important for commendamide biosynthesis and we present phylogenetic and functional data showing that orthologues of choA are found only in the order Bacteroidales. Therefore, the production of commendamide may be an adaptation to the environments colonized by the Bacteroidales, including the mammalian gut. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-13774-6
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Human gut microbiome en
dc.subject Eubacterium-coprostanoligenes en
dc.subject Fragilis hemolysins en
dc.subject Environmental DNA en
dc.subject Escherichia-coli en
dc.subject Identification en
dc.subject Biosynthesis en
dc.subject Expression en
dc.subject Bacterium en
dc.subject Lipids en
dc.title The Bacteroidales produce an N-acylated derivative of glycine with both cholesterol-solubilising and hemolytic activity en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother David Clarke, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: david.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress david.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 13270
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2275/IE/Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC)/
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Investigator Programme/12/IP/1493/IE/Characterizaton of choA, a gene encoding a novel cholesterol-degrading activity in the human gut microbiome/
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Investigator Programme/12/IP/1315/IE/The Direct Arylation of Pyrones, Coumarins, Pyridones and Quinolones/


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© 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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