Intervention strategies for cesarean section-induced alterations in the microbiota-gut-brain axis

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dc.contributor.author Moya-Pérez, Angela
dc.contributor.author Luczynski, Pauline
dc.contributor.author Renes, Ingrid B.
dc.contributor.author Wang, Shugui
dc.contributor.author Borre, Yuliya E.
dc.contributor.author Ryan, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.author Knol, Jan
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-15T11:47:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-15T11:47:19Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Moya-Pérez, A., Luczynski, P., Renes, I. B., Wang, S., Borre, Y., Anthony Ryan, C., Knol, J., Stanton, C., Dinan, T. G. and Cryan, J. F. (2017) 'Intervention strategies for cesarean section–induced alterations in the microbiota-gut-brain axis', Nutrition Reviews, 75(4), pp. 225-240. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nuw069 en
dc.identifier.volume 75
dc.identifier.issued 4
dc.identifier.startpage 225
dc.identifier.endpage 240
dc.identifier.issn 0029-6643
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6355
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/nutrit/nuw069
dc.description.abstract Microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential process that modulates host physiology and immunity. Recently, researchers have begun to understand how and when these microorganisms colonize the gut and the early-life factors that impact their natural ecological establishment. The vertical transmission of maternal microbes to the offspring is a critical factor for host immune and metabolic development. Increasing evidence also points to a role in the wiring of the gut-brain axis. This process may be altered by various factors such as mode of delivery, gestational age at birth, the use of antibiotics in early life, infant feeding, and hygiene practices. In fac(t), these early exposures that impact the intestinal microbiota have been associated with the development of diseases such as obesity, type 1 diabetes, asthma, allergies, and even neurodevelopmental disorders. The present review summarizes the impact of cesarean birth on the gut microbiome and the health status of the developing infant and discusses possible preventative and restorative strategies to compensate for early-life microbial perturbations. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Department of Agriculture Food Marine (INFANTMET; SMARTFOOD; TODDLERFOOD) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en
dc.relation.uri https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article/75/4/225/3098294
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Cesarean section en
dc.subject Metabolism en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.subject Immunity en
dc.subject Prebiotics en
dc.subject Probiotics en
dc.title Intervention strategies for cesarean section-induced alterations in the microbiota-gut-brain axis en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John F Cryan, Anatomy & Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine
dc.contributor.funder Seventh Framework Programme
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nutrition Reviews en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP1::KBBE/613979/EU/Microbiome Influence on Energy balance and Brain Development-Function Put into Action to Tackle Diet-related Diseases and Behavior./MYNEWGUT
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/


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© 2017, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
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