Use of bioluminescence imaging to track neutrophil migration and its inhibition in experimental colitis

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dc.contributor.author Murphy, Carola T.
dc.contributor.author Moloney, Gerard M.
dc.contributor.author Hall, Lindsay J.
dc.contributor.author Quinlan, Aoife
dc.contributor.author Faivre, Emilie
dc.contributor.author Casey, Pat G.
dc.contributor.author Shanahan, Fergus
dc.contributor.author Melgar, Silvia
dc.contributor.author Nally, Kenneth
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-24T15:30:38Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-24T15:30:38Z
dc.date.issued 2010-10
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, C. T., Moloney, G., Hall, L. J., Quinlan, A., Faivre, E., Casey, P., Shanahan, F., Melgar, S. and Nally, K. (2010) 'Use of bioluminescence imaging to track neutrophil migration and its inhibition in experimental colitis', Clinical & Experimental Immunology, 162(1), pp. 188-196. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04234.x en
dc.identifier.volume 162 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 188 en
dc.identifier.endpage 196 en
dc.identifier.issn 1365-2249
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/640
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04234.x
dc.description.abstract Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with neutrophil infiltration into the mucosa and crypt abscesses. The chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 [murine homologues (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2] and its receptor CXCR2 are required for neutrophil recruitment; thus, blocking this engagement is a potential therapeutic strategy. In the present study, we developed a preclinical model of neutrophil migration suitable for investigating the biology of and testing new drugs that target neutrophil trafficking. Peritoneal exudate neutrophils from transgenic beta-actin-luciferase mice were isolated 12 h after intraperitoneal injection with thioglycollate, and were assessed phenotypically and functionally. Exudate cells were injected intravenously into recipients with dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis followed by bioluminescence imaging of whole-body and ex vivo organs at 2, 4 and 16-22 h post-transfer. Anti-KC antibody or an isotype control were administered at 20 mu g/mouse 1 h before transfer, followed by whole-body and organ imaging 4 h post-transfer. The peritoneal exudate consisted of 80% neutrophils, 39% of which were CXCR2+. In vitro migration towards KC was inhibited by anti-KC. Ex vivo bioluminescent imaging showed that neutrophil trafficking into the colon of DSS recipients was inhibited by anti-KC 4 h post-cell transfer. In conclusion, this study describes a new approach for investigating neutrophil trafficking that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate potential inhibitors of neutrophil recruitment. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (02/CE/B124); Science Foundation Ireland (07/CE/B1368) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com en
dc.subject In-vivo en
dc.subject Expression en
dc.subject CXCR2 en
dc.subject Mice en
dc.subject Granulocytes en
dc.subject Neutrophil recruitment en
dc.subject Chemokines en
dc.subject.lcsh Inflammatory bowel diseases en
dc.subject.lcsh Ulcerative colitis en
dc.subject.lcsh Crohn’s disease en
dc.title Use of bioluminescence imaging to track neutrophil migration and its inhibition in experimental colitis en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/D010/carolamurphy en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/C012/fshanahan en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/C012/knally en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Carola Murphy, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: carola.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aoife Quinlan, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.quinlan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Fergus Shanahan, Alimentary Pharmabotic Centre, Biosciences Building, University College Cork, Ireland. E-mail: f.shanahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kenneth Nally, Medicine Department, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. E-mail: k.nally@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gerard Moloney, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: G.Moloney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Lindsay Hall, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:L.HALL@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Emilie Faivre, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:E.Faivre@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Pat Casey, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:P.Casey@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Silvia Melgar, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: S.Melgar@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2012-07-24T10:59:59Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 70046730
dc.internal.wokid 000281709100022
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Clinical and Experimental Immunology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes Blackwell Publisheing http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/pdf/cei_elf.pdf en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress carola.murphy@ucc.ie en


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