Effects of environmental colour on mood: a wearable LifeColour capture device

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dc.contributor.author Doherty, Aiden R.
dc.contributor.author Kelly, Philip
dc.contributor.author O'Flynn, Brendan
dc.contributor.author Curran, Padraig
dc.contributor.author Smeaton, Alan F.
dc.contributor.author Ó Mathúna, S. Cian
dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Noel E.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-26T12:10:56Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-26T12:10:56Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Aiden R. Doherty, Philip Kelly, Brendan O'Flynn, Padraig Curran, Alan F. Smeaton, Cian O'Mathuna, and Noel E. O'Connor. Effects of environmental colour on mood: a wearable LifeColour capture device. In Proceedings of the international conference on Multimedia (MM '10). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1655-1658. DOI=10.1145/1873951.1874313 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1873951.1874313 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1655 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1658 en
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-60558-933-6
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/645
dc.identifier.doi 10.1145/1873951.1874313
dc.description.abstract Colour is everywhere in our daily lives and impacts things like our mood, yet we rarely take notice of it. One method of capturing and analysing the predominant colours that we encounter is through visual lifelogging devices such as the SenseCam. However an issue related to these devices is the privacy concerns of capturing image level detail. Therefore in this work we demonstrate a hardware prototype wearable camera that captures only one pixel - of the dominant colour prevelant in front of the user, thus circumnavigating the privacy concerns raised in relation to lifelogging. To simulate whether the capture of dominant colour would be sufficient we report on a simulation carried out on 1.2 million SenseCam images captured by a group of 20 individuals. We compare the dominant colours that different groups of people are exposed to and show that useful inferences can be made from this data. We believe our prototype may be valuable in future experiments to capture colour correlated associated with an individual's mood.Colour is everywhere in our daily lives and impacts things like our mood, yet we rarely take notice of it. One method of capturing and analysing the predominant colours that we encounter is through visual lifelogging devices such as the SenseCam. However an issue related to these devices is the privacy concerns of capturing image level detail. Therefore in this work we demonstrate a hardware prototype wearable camera that captures only one pixel - of the dominant colour prevelant in front of the user, thus circumnavigating the privacy concerns raised in relation to lifelogging. To simulate whether the capture of dominant colour would be sufficient we report on a simulation carried out on 1.2 million SenseCam images captured by a group of 20 individuals. We compare the dominant colours that different groups of people are exposed to and show that useful inferences can be made from this data. We believe our prototype may be valuable in future experiments to capture colour correlated associated with an individual's mood. en
dc.description.uri http://www.acmmm10.org/page/6/ en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher ACM en
dc.relation.ispartof ACM International Conference on Multimedia (MM '10), Firenze, Italy. 25-29 October 2010.
dc.relation.uri http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1873951.1874313
dc.rights © ACM, 2010. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the international conference on Multimedia (MM '10), http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1873951.1874313 en
dc.subject Lifelogging en
dc.subject SenseCam en
dc.subject Wearable cameras en
dc.subject Colour and mood en
dc.subject Design en
dc.subject Experimentation en
dc.subject Human factors en
dc.title Effects of environmental colour on mood: a wearable LifeColour capture device en
dc.type Conference item en
dc.internal.authorurl http://www.tyndall.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Cian O Mathuna, Tyndall Microsystems, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: cian.omathuna@tyndall.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2012-07-26T12:01:20Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 157389908
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.conferencelocation Firenze, Italy en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress cian.omathuna@tyndall.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Centre for Science Engineering and Technology (CSET)/07/CE/I1147/IE/CSET CLARITY: Bringing Information to Life/


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