Phenotypic integration and the evolution of signal repertoires: a case study of treefrog acoustic communication

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dc.contributor.author Reichert, Michael S.
dc.contributor.author Hoebel, Gerlinde
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-18T11:56:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-18T11:56:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Reichert, M. S. and Hoebel, G. (2018) 'Phenotypic integration and the evolution of signal repertoires: a case study of treefrog acoustic communication', Ecology and Evolution, 8(6), pp. 3410-3429. doi: 10.1002/ece3.3927 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.issued 6
dc.identifier.startpage 3410
dc.identifier.endpage 3429
dc.identifier.issn 2045-7758
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6480
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/ece3.3927
dc.description.abstract Animal signals are inherently complex phenotypes with many interacting parts combining to elicit responses from receivers. The pattern of interrelationships between signal components reflects the extent to which each component is expressed, and responds to selection, either in concert with or independently of others. Furthermore, many species have complex repertoires consisting of multiple signal types used in different contexts, and common morphological and physiological constraints may result in interrelationships extending across the multiple signals in species' repertoires. The evolutionary significance of interrelationships between signal traits can be explored within the framework of phenotypic integration, which offers a suite of quantitative techniques to characterize complex phenotypes. In particular, these techniques allow for the assessment of modularity and integration, which describe, respectively, the extent to which sets of traits covary either independently or jointly. Although signal and repertoire complexity are thought to be major drivers of diversification and social evolution, few studies have explicitly measured the phenotypic integration of signals to investigate the evolution of diverse communication systems. We applied methods from phenotypic integration studies to quantify integration in the two primary vocalization types (advertisement and aggressive calls) in the treefrogs Hyla versicolor, Hyla cinerea, and Dendropsophus ebraccatus. We recorded male calls and calculated standardized phenotypic variance-covariance (P) matrices for characteristics within and across call types. We found significant integration across call types, but the strength of integration varied by species and corresponded with the acoustic similarity of the call types within each species. H.versicolor had the most modular advertisement and aggressive calls and the least acoustically similar call types. Additionally, P was robust to changing social competition levels in H.versicolor. Our findings suggest new directions in animal communication research in which the complex relationships among the traits of multiple signals are a key consideration for understanding signal evolution. en
dc.description.sponsorship National Science Foundation (Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (1010791); U.S. Department of Education (P200A070476) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc. en
dc.relation.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ece3.3927
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Anuran en
dc.subject Complex signal en
dc.subject Modularity en
dc.subject Phenotypic integration en
dc.subject Signal evolution en
dc.title Phenotypic integration and the evolution of signal repertoires: a case study of treefrog acoustic communication en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Michael S. Reichert, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: +353-21-490-3000 E: michaelreichert@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Chicago Herpetological Society
dc.contributor.funder U.S. Department of Education
dc.contributor.funder American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
dc.contributor.funder Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
dc.contributor.funder National Science Foundation
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Ecology and Evolution en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress michaelreichert@ucc.ie en


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© 2018, the Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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