Climate change leads to differential shifts in the timing of annual cycle stages in a migratory bird

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Tomotani, Barbara M.
dc.contributor.author van der Jeugd, Henk
dc.contributor.author Gienapp, Phillip
dc.contributor.author de la Hera, Iván
dc.contributor.author Pilzecker, Jos
dc.contributor.author Teichmann, Corry
dc.contributor.author Visser, Marcel E.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-18T11:56:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-18T11:56:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Tomotani, B. M., van der Jeugd, H., Gienapp, P., de la Hera, I., Pilzecker, J., Teichmann, C. and Visser, M. E. (2018) 'Climate change leads to differential shifts in the timing of annual cycle stages in a migratory bird', Global Change Biology, 24(2), pp. 823-835. doi: 10.1111/gcb.14006 en
dc.identifier.volume 24
dc.identifier.issued 2
dc.identifier.startpage 823
dc.identifier.endpage 835
dc.identifier.issn 1354-1013
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6481
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/gcb.14006
dc.description.abstract Shifts in reproductive phenology due to climate change have been well documented in many species but how, within the same species, other annual cycle stages (e.g. moult, migration) shift relative to the timing of breeding has rarely been studied. When stages shift at different rates, the interval between stages may change resulting in overlaps, and as each stage is energetically demanding, these overlaps may have negative fitness consequences. We used long-term data of a population of European pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to investigate phenological shifts in three annual cycle stages: spring migration (arrival dates), breeding (egg-laying and hatching dates) and the onset of postbreeding moult. We found different advancements in the timing of breeding compared with moult (moult advances faster) and no advancement in arrival dates. To understand these differential shifts, we explored which temperatures best explain the year-to-year variation in the timing of these stages, and show that they respond differently to temperature increases in the Netherlands, causing the intervals between arrival and breeding and between breeding and moult to decrease. Next, we tested the fitness consequences of these shortened intervals. We found no effect on clutch size, but the probability of a fledged chick to recruit increased with a shorter arrival-breeding interval (earlier breeding). Finally, mark-recapture analyses did not detect an effect of shortened intervals on adult survival. Our results suggest that the advancement of breeding allows more time for fledgling development, increasing their probability to recruit. This may incur costs to other parts of the annual cycle, but, despite the shorter intervals, there was no effect on adult survival. Our results show that to fully understand the consequences of climate change, it is necessary to look carefully at different annual cycle stages, especially for organisms with complex cycles, such as migratory birds. en
dc.description.sponsorship Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (237790/2012-2); Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (UPS/375/ECO/J1534) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc. en
dc.relation.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14006
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Breeding en
dc.subject European pied flycatcher en
dc.subject Ficedula hypoleuca en
dc.subject Fitness en
dc.subject Mark-recapture en
dc.subject Migration en
dc.subject Moult en
dc.subject Recruitment en
dc.title Climate change leads to differential shifts in the timing of annual cycle stages in a migratory bird en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Iván de la Hera, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: ivan.delahera@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico
dc.contributor.funder Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Global Change Biology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress ivan.delahera@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2017, the Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement