Seeing the wood from the trees: a critical policy analysis of intersections between social class inequality and education in twenty-first century Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Cahill, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-25T08:43:15Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-25T08:43:15Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12
dc.identifier.citation Cahill, K. (2015) 'Seeing the wood from the trees: a critical policy analysis of intersections between social class inequality and education in twenty-first century Ireland', International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, 8(2), pp. 301-316. en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 301 en
dc.identifier.endpage 316 en
dc.identifier.issn 1307-9298
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6497
dc.description.abstract This paper is a critical policy analysis of intersections between social class inequality and education policy in Ireland. The focus is upon contemporary policy and legislation such as The Irish Constitution and equality legislation; social inclusion policies such as the DEIS scheme; literacy and numeracy policy documents; as well as current government policy statements on education. It utilises Stephen Ball’s policy analysis tools of policy as text, policy as discourse and policy effects to examine the social, cultural and political constructs of policy and legislation influencing social class inequality in education in Ireland (Ball, 1993). The focus is upon the refusal to name social class as a significant issue despite the weight of evidence showing the key influence class position and access to economic and cultural resources has on one’s educational opportunities, experiences and outcomes. The approach taken here is discursive in the sense that the documents are the data and the findings are infused with detailed theoretical discussion of contemporary issues around inequality in education in Ireland. The analysis finds that the absence of social class in official policy and legislative discourses is indicative of a growing neoliberalisation of education policy in Ireland where increased foci on international comparisons and a consumer-driven philosophy of educational provision militate against equality for students from lower socio-economic groups. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher T&K Academic en
dc.relation.uri https://www.iejee.com/index.php/IEJEE/article/view/114
dc.rights © 2015, International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education. This article is made available under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Critical policy analysis en
dc.subject Educational inequality en
dc.subject Social class and education en
dc.subject Irish education policy en
dc.title Seeing the wood from the trees: a critical policy analysis of intersections between social class inequality and education in twenty-first century Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kevin Cahill, Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.cahill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-07-24T11:17:15Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 395506544
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress K.Cahill@ucc.ie en


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© 2015, International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education. This article is made available under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education. This article is made available under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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