Comparative genomics and genotype-phenotype associations in Bifidobacterium breve

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dc.contributor.author Bottacini, Francesca
dc.contributor.author Morrissey, Ruth
dc.contributor.author Esteban-Torres, María
dc.contributor.author James, Kieran
dc.contributor.author van Breen, Justin
dc.contributor.author Dikareva, Evgenia
dc.contributor.author Egan, Muireann
dc.contributor.author Lambert, Jolanda
dc.contributor.author van Limpt, Kees
dc.contributor.author Knol, Jan
dc.contributor.author Motherway, Mary O'Connell
dc.contributor.author van Sinderen, Douwe
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T15:47:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T15:47:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Bottacini, F., Morrissey, R., Esteban-Torres, M., James, K., van Breen, J., Dikareva, E., Egan, M., Lambert, J., van Limpt, K., Knol, J., O’Connell Motherway, M. and van Sinderen, D. (2018) 'Comparative genomics and genotype-phenotype associations in Bifidobacterium breve', Scientific Reports, 8(1), 10633 (14pp). doi:10.1038/s41598-018-28919-4 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 14
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6665
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-018-28919-4
dc.description.abstract Bifidobacteria are common members of the gastro-intestinal microbiota of a broad range of animal hosts. Their successful adaptation to this particular niche is linked to their saccharolytic metabolism, which is supported by a wide range of glycosyl hydrolases. In the current study a large-scale genetrait matching (GTM) effort was performed to explore glycan degradation capabilities in B. breve. By correlating the presence/absence of genes and associated genomic clusters with growth/no-growth patterns across a dataset of 20 Bifidobacterium breve strains and nearly 80 different potential growth substrates, we not only validated the approach for a number of previously characterized carbohydrate utilization clusters, but we were also able to discover novel genetic clusters linked to the metabolism of salicin and sucrose. Using GTM, genetic associations were also established for antibiotic resistance and exopolysaccharide production, thereby identifying (novel) bifidobacterial antibiotic resistance markers and showing that the GTM approach is applicable to a variety of phenotypes. Overall, the GTM findings clearly expand our knowledge on members of the B. breve species, in particular how their variable genetic features can be linked to specific phenotypes. en
dc.description.sponsorship Federation of European Microbiological Societies (FEMS-RG-2016-0103); Irish Research Council (GOIPD/2017/1302); Health Research Board (PDTM/2011/9) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer Nature en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-28919-4
dc.rights © 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Animalis subsp lactis en
dc.subject Intestinal microbiota en
dc.subject Gut microbiota en
dc.subject Encoding gene en
dc.subject UCC2003 en
dc.subject Metabolism en
dc.subject Infants en
dc.subject Health en
dc.subject Oligosaccharides en
dc.subject Identification en
dc.title Comparative genomics and genotype-phenotype associations in Bifidobacterium breve en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Douwe Van Sinderen, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Nutricia Research Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Federation of European Microbiological Societies
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress kieran.james@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 10633
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/


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© 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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