Interprofessional team member's satisfaction: a mixed methods study of a Chilean hospital

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dc.contributor.author Espinoza, Pilar
dc.contributor.author Peduzzi, Marina
dc.contributor.author Agreli, Heloise F.
dc.contributor.author Sutherland, Melissa A.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T15:47:24Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T15:47:24Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Espinoza, P., Peduzzi, M., Agreli, H. F. and Sutherland, M. A. (2018) 'Interprofessional team member’s satisfaction: a mixed methods study of a Chilean hospital', Human Resources for Health, 16(1), 30 (12pp). doi: 10.1186/s12960-018-0290-z en
dc.identifier.volume 16
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 12
dc.identifier.issn 1478-4491
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6668
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12960-018-0290-z
dc.description.abstract Introduction: The health organizations of today are highly complex and specialized. Given this scenario, there is a need for health professionals to work collaboratively within interprofessional work teams to ensure quality and safe care. To strengthen interprofessional teamwork, it is imperative that health organizations enhance strategic human resources management by promoting team member satisfaction. Objective: To analyze the satisfaction of members in interprofessional teams and to explore interpersonal relationships, leadership, and team climate in a hospital context. Methodology: This study is an explanatory sequential mixed methods (quantitative/qualitative) study of 53 teams (409 professionals) at a university hospital in Santiago, Chile. The first phase involved quantitative surveys with team members examining team satisfaction, transformational leadership, and team climate. Social network analysis was used to identify interactions among team members (cohesion and centrality). The second phase involved interviews with 15 professionals belonging to teams with the highest and lowest team satisfaction scores. Findings of both phases were integrated. Results: Significant associations were found among variables, and the linear regression model showed that team climate (beta = 0.26) was a better predictor of team satisfaction than team leadership (beta = 0.17). Registered nurse was perceived as the profession with the highest score on the transformational leadership measure (mean = 64), followed by the physician (mean = 33). Team networks with the highest and lowest score of team satisfaction showed differences in cohesion and centrality measures. Analysis of interviews identified five themes: attributes of interprofessional work; collaboration, communication, and social interaction; interprofessional team innovation; shared leadership; and interpersonal relationship interface work/social. Integration of findings revealed that team member satisfaction requires participation and communication, common goals and commitment for patientcentered care, clear roles and objectives to support collaborative work, and the presence of a transformational leader to strengthen well-being, dialog, and innovation. Conclusions: Results have the potential to contribute to the planning and decision-making in the field of human resources, providing elements to promote the management of health teams and support team member satisfaction. In turn, this could lead to job permanence especially where the local health needs are more urgent. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12960-018-0290-z
dc.rights © 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Interdisciplinary teams en
dc.subject Healthcare teams en
dc.subject Team work en
dc.subject Satisfaction with the team en
dc.subject Transformational leadership en
dc.subject Team climate en
dc.subject Mixed methods en
dc.title Interprofessional team member's satisfaction: a mixed methods study of a Chilean hospital en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Heloise Agreli, Nursing & Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: heloise.agreli@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Human Resources for Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress heloise.agreli@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 30


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© 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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