Extending the "one strain many compounds" (OSMAC) principle to marine microorganisms

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dc.contributor.author Romano, Stefano
dc.contributor.author Jackson, Stephen A.
dc.contributor.author Patry, Sloane
dc.contributor.author Dobson, Alan D. W.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T15:47:27Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T15:47:27Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Romano, S., Jackson, S., Patry, S. and Dobson, A. (2018) 'Extending the "one strain many compounds" (OSMAC) principle to marine microorganisms', Marine Drugs, 16(7), 244 (29pp). doi: 10.3390/md16070244 en
dc.identifier.volume 16
dc.identifier.issued 7
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 29
dc.identifier.issn 1660-3397
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6677
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/md16070244
dc.description.abstract Genomic data often highlights an inconsistency between the number of gene clusters identified using bioinformatic approaches as potentially producing secondary metabolites and the actual number of chemically characterized secondary metabolites produced by any given microorganism. Such gene clusters are generally considered as "silent", meaning that they are not expressed under laboratory conditions. Triggering expression of these "silent" clusters could result in unlocking the chemical diversity they control, allowing the discovery of novel molecules of both medical and biotechnological interest. Therefore, both genetic and cultivation-based techniques have been developed aimed at stimulating expression of these "silent" genes. The principles behind the cultivation based approaches have been conceptualized in the "one strain many compounds" (OSMAC) framework, which underlines how a single strain can produce different molecules when grown under different environmental conditions. Parameters such as, nutrient content, temperature, and rate of aeration can be easily changed, altering the global physiology of a microbial strain and in turn significantly affecting its secondary metabolism. As a direct extension of such approaches, co-cultivation strategies and the addition of chemical elicitors have also been used as cues to activate "silent" clusters. In this review, we aim to provide a focused and comprehensive overview of these strategies as they pertain to marine microbes. Moreover, we underline how changes in some parameters which have provided important results in terrestrial microbes, but which have rarely been considered in marine microorganisms, may represent additional strategies to awaken "silent" gene clusters in marine microbes. Unfortunately, the empirical nature of the OSMAC approach forces scientists to perform extensive laboratory experiments. Nevertheless, we believe that some computation and experimental based techniques which are used in other disciplines, and which we discuss; could be effectively employed to help streamline the OSMAC based approaches. We believe that natural products discovery in marine microorganisms would be greatly aided through the integration of basic microbiological approaches, computational methods, and technological innovations, thereby helping unearth much of the as yet untapped potential of these microorganisms. en
dc.description.sponsorship Marine Institute (National Marine Biotechnology Laboratory award - PBA/MB/16/01) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation.uri http://www.mdpi.com/1660-3397/16/7/244
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Secondary metabolites en
dc.subject Biosynthetic gene clusters en
dc.subject Cultivation en
dc.subject Environmental cues en
dc.subject Co-cultivation en
dc.subject Chemical elicitors en
dc.subject One strain many compounds en
dc.subject Osmac en
dc.title Extending the "one strain many compounds" (OSMAC) principle to marine microorganisms en
dc.type Review en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Alan Dobson, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.dobson@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Marine Institute
dc.contributor.funder Horizon 2020 Framework Programme
dc.contributor.funder European Commission
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Marine Drugs en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.dobson@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 244
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::MSCA-ITN-ETN/721421/EU/Improving the flow in the pipeline of the next generation of marine biodiscovery scientists/MarPipe
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP1::KBBE/312184/EU/Increasing Value and Flow in the Marine Biodiscovery Pipeline/PHARMASEA


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© 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
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